A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following?

A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following
A law enforcement officer may require an operator to submit which of the following? (A) or breath and field sobriety tests. ‘Teak surfing’ is strongly discouraged in the state of Florida, what is one of the main safety concerns involving this activity?

Which of the following is responsibility of a boat operator?

The Boat Operator’s Ultimate Responsibilities – A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following As the boat operator, you are completely responsible for:

The operation of the boat. The safety of every passenger on board the boat. Any activities that occur on the boat. Practicing situational awareness at all times. The safety of anyone who comes into contact with that boat, including the safety of other boaters on the water.

Remember : As the boat operator, YOU are fully responsible for EVERYTHING that happens on the boat.

Which of the following best describe the operators rule of responsibility?

The vessel operator is responsible for acting in a prudent and reasonable manner consistent with the ordinary practices of boating.

Stay active. Stay alert. Respect the weather, the water, your passengers, fellow boaters, divers, swimmers, and property owners.

Vessel operators need to pay attention and operate their vessels responsibly.5/33

Who is responsible for the safety of the boat and the people onboard?

Understanding Your Responsibilities to Guests and Other Boaters – When a guest steps aboard, the typical boat owner is more likely to be thinking more about having lunch or getting underway than worrying about his responsibilities as “Master” of the vessel. The question of liability is both simple and complex, steeped in more than 3,000 years of maritime legal principles dating back to the Phoenicians. Admiralty law, like land-based legal concepts, starts with the premise that a property owner owes his invited guest a duty to exercise ordinary or reasonable care for the safety of the guest.

  • Deciding just what constitutes reasonable care can be especially complicated on a boat, which is bobbing, slippery and filled with obstructions.
  • It has a great deal to do with the experience of the boat owner and the boating experience of the passenger and whether the boat owner had or should have had knowledge or notice of some dangerous condition.

Additionally, it may depend on whether the owner knew or should have known his guest was unaware of or unfamiliar with the condition. The duty to exercise reasonable care is rooted in the duty to provide a reasonably safe boat for the invited guest. This does not require that the boat be accident proof.

Under the law, the applicable standard of care requires the boat owner to provide a boat that is reasonably safe, not one that is absolutely safe. A guest also has some responsibility – a duty to exercise care for his or her own safety. A guest cannot simply walk blindly about the boat. But reasonable care does mean that you may be held accountable if you fail to warn a guest, for example, about a ladder you know is unstable.

Here is an example of an insurance claim to illustrate responsibility: A skipper invited an acquaintance to come by and inspect the aging sport fisherman he’d been fixing up for two years. Like most boats that are being restored from the keel up, the old boat was loaded with half-finished projects – wiring, cabinetry, engines, etc. The friend wound up in the engine compartment only a few inches from the skipper. The friend’s injuries were neither serious nor permanent, but the skipper knew of the hazard and failed to warn his guest, which meant that he may well have been liable if the case had gone to court.

  1. What about a clearly visible hazard such as an uncovered hatch? The law call this “open and obvious” danger, but courts have had trouble agreeing on whether you have to give someone a warning in the face of such a known risk.
  2. Some judges have ruled that the duty to warn is not imposed when you have an open and obvious condition since, under a standard of reasonable care, everyone is equally able to see the hazard.

Other courts, however, have ruled that your invited guest may not appreciate the risk of what you believe is a readily apparent danger. Even more to the point, however, is the practical reality of ever-increasing numbers of lawsuits. Not only are lawsuits expensive, they are time consuming and take a tremendous emotional toll.

Whatever legal comfort you might get in thinking that the danger is obvious, the reality is that the situation in the legal world today instructs you should always err on the side of giving a warning. As an experienced skipper you know that a boat can pitch suddenly when it goes through a wake or comes about.

You know to hang on until the boat is steady again. But these situations may be new and hazardous to a guest. Clearly then, as skipper, you have the responsibility to warn an unsuspecting guest when you are aware of a hazardous situation on your boat. Further, you have a responsibility to warn guests about possible risks that are unrelated to your boat, but which are all around you: passing boat wakes, severe weather, tidal changes, etc.

  • And, even if you are unaware of a loose railing, wobbly step, etc.
  • Or you don’t see an approaching boat wake, you may still be liable for any injuries that result.
  • And finally, operator responsibility extends to those guests and other waterway users that are in the water.
  • Unfortunately, propeller strikes are a common source of injury and even death.

As an operator, beware and use extreme caution when people are in the water and turn off your engine anytime a person is in the water and within one boat length of the boat. Also, it is advisable to educate your guests about the dangers of swimming around a boat and how to re-board the boat properly so as to avoid injury.

Which of the following actions is required of powerboat A when approaching sailboat B?

Powerboat A: When only a white light is visible, you may be overtaking another vessel. Give way to either side. Powerboat B: You are being overtaken. Stand on. Powerboat A: When only white and red lights are visible, you are approaching the port side of a powerboat. Give way to your starboard side. Powerboat B: When only white and green lights are visible, you are approaching the starboard side of a powerboat. Stand on. Powerboat A: When white, red and green lights are visible, you are approaching a powerboat head-on. Give way to your starboard side. Powerboat B: When white, red and green lights are visible, you are approaching a powerboat head-on. Give way to your starboard side. Powerboat A: When only red and green lights are visible, you are approaching a sailboat head-on. Give way to your starboard side. Powerboat B: When white, red and green lights are visible, you are approaching a powerboat head-on. Stand on. Powerboat A: When only a red light is visible, you are approaching the port side of a sailboat. Give way to your starboard side. Powerboat B: When white and green lights are visible, you are approaching the starboard side of a powerboat. Stand on. Powerboat A: When only a green light is visible, you are approaching the starboard side of a sailboat. Give way to your port side. Powerboat B: When white and red lights are visible, you are approaching the port side of a powerboat. Stand on.17/33

What is the responsibility of the operator’s?

Operators are skilled technicians who control light or heavy machinery in various fields and use their in-depth knowledge to perform tasks including producing goods or making repairs.

What is the operators rule of responsibility?

A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following Collisions can be prevented easily if every vessel operator fulfills three major responsibilities.

Practice good seamanship. It is the responsibility of every boat or personal watercraft (PWC) operator to take all necessary action to avoid a collision, taking into account the weather, vessel traffic, and limits of other vessels. Such action should be taken in ample time to avoid a collision and at a safe distance from other vessels. Keep a proper lookout. Failing to keep a sharp lookout is the most common cause of collisions. Every operator must keep a proper lookout, using both sight and hearing, at all times. Watch and listen for other vessels, radio communications, navigational hazards, and others involved in water activities. Maintain a safe speed. Safe speed is the speed that ensures you will have ample time to avoid a collision and can stop within an appropriate distance. Safe speed will vary depending on conditions such as wind, water conditions, navigational hazards, visibility, surrounding vessel traffic density, and the maneuverability of your boat or PWC. Always reduce speed and navigate with extreme caution at night and when visibility is restricted.

What is the priority for the operator?

The operators are listed in order of priority, group 1 having the highest priority and group 7 the lowest. All operators in the same priority group have the same priority. For example, the exponentiation operator ** has the same priority as the prefix + and prefix – operators and the not operator ¬.

Which of the following is one of the legal requirements while operating a PWC?

Personal Watercraft (PWC) in Florida Online Boating License & Boaters Safety Course Accredited by NASBLA A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following PWC are considered vessels and must comply with all safety equipment such as visual distress signals, life jackets, navigation lights, and sound producing device. In addition to the requirements previously stated applicable to all motorized vessels:

Each person on a PWC or being towed by a PWC must wear a USCG approved PFD type I, II, III or V Inflatable PFD are prohibited for personal watercraft use The law requires anyone operating a PWC equipped with a lanyard cut-off switch to attach the lanyard to his or her person, clothing or life jacket, Operating a PWC equipped with a self-circling device is prohibited if the device has been altered Maneuvering a PWC by weaving through congested vessel traffic, jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably close or when visibility around the vessel is obstructed, or swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision is classified as reckless operation of a vessel (a first-degree misdemeanor) It is illegal for a person under the age of 14 to operate a PWC A person must be at least 18 years old to rent a personal watercraft in Florida. It is unlawful for a person to knowingly allow a person under 14 years old to operate a personal watercraft (a second-degree misdemeanor). Personal watercraft may not be operated from 1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise, even if the PWCE is equipped with navigation lights. Remember, both federal and state law requires the use of navigation lights during periods of inclement weather and periods of reduced visibility, including the ½ hour before sunrise and the ½ hour after sunset. You may not carry more passengers than the number for which the craft was designed to carry by the manufacturer. When towing someone on a tube or on water skis, the PWC must have the appropriate capacity to accommodate the operator, the observer, and the person being towed.

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What is the priority order of operators?

Operator precedence

Precedence Operator Associativity
1 -> Left-to-right
(type)
2 ++ – Right-to-left
+ –

Which of the following is a legal requirement for boat operation?

California law requires a person to be 16 years of age or older and in possession of his/her California Boater Card to legally operate a vessel powered by a motor of 15 hp or more, including personal watercraft (PWCs).

Who is responsible for the safety of passengers?

Yes, drivers are responsible for their passengers. Drivers are expected to act reasonably and safely on the road in order to ensure their passengers’ safety, and if they don’t, they’re responsible for covering any injuries that a passenger sustains in their vehicle.

Who is responsible for the operation of the ship and must report the full name and details of such entity to the administration as per company’s responsibilities and authority?

The International Safety Management Code (ISM Code 1993) The International Safety Management Code IMO Assembly Resolution A.741(18) – 1993

  • THE ASSEMBLY,
  • RECALLING Article 15(j) of the Convention on the International Maritime Organization concerning the functions of the Assembly in relation to regulations and guidelines concerning maritime safety and the prevention and control of marine pollution from ships,
  • RECALLING ALSO resolution A.680(17), by which it invited Member Governments to encourage those responsible for the management and operation of ships to take appropriate steps to develop, implement and assess safety and pollution prevention management in accordance with the IMO Guidelines on management for the safe operation of ships and for pollution prevention,
  • RECALLING ALSO resolution A.596(15), by which it requested the Maritime Safety Committee to develop, as a matter of urgency, guidelines, wherever relevant, concerning shipboard and shore-based management and its decision to include in the work programme of the Maritime Safety Committee and the Marine Environment Protection Committee an item on shipboard and shore-based management for the safe operation of ships and for the prevention of marine pollution, respectively,
  • RECALLING FURTHER resolution A.441(XI), by which it invited every State to take the necessary steps to ensure that the owner of a ship which flies the flag of that State provides such State with the current information necessary to enable it to identify and contact the person contracted or otherwise entrusted by the owner to discharge his responsibilities for that ship in regard to matters relating to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment,
  • FURTHER RECALLING resolution A.443(XI), by which it invited Governments to take the necessary steps to safeguard the shipmaster in the proper discharge of his responsibilities in regard to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment,
  • RECOGNIZING the need for appropriate organization of management to enable it to respond to the need of those on board ships to achieve and maintain high standards of safety and environmental protection,
  • RECOGNIZING ALSO that the most important means of preventing maritime casualties and pollution of the sea from ships is to design, construct, equip and maintain ships and to operate them with properly trained crews in compliance with international conventions and standards relating to maritime safety and pollution prevention,
  • NOTING that the Maritime Safety Committee is developing requirements for adoption by Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) 1974, which will make compliance with the Code referred to in operative paragraph 1 mandatory,
  • CONSIDERING that the early implementation of that Code would greatly assist in improving safety at sea and protection of the marine environment,
  • NOTING FURTHER that the Maritime Safety Committee and the Marine Environment Protection Committee have reviewed resolution A.680(17) and the Guidelines annexed thereto in developing the Code,
  • HAVING CONSIDERED the recommendations made by the Maritime Safety Committee at its sixty-second session and by the Marine Environment Protection Committee at its thirty-fourth session,
  1. ADOPTS the International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention, (International Safety Management (ISM) Code), set out in the Annex to the present resolution;
  2. STRONGLY URGES Governments to implement the ISM Code on a national basis, giving priority to passenger ships, tankers, gas carriers, bulk carriers and mobile offshore units, which are flying their flags, as soon as possible but not later than 1 June 1998, pending development of the mandatory applications of the Code;
  3. REQUESTS GOVERNMENTS to inform the Maritime Safety Committee and the Marine Environment Protection Committee of the action they have taken in implementing the ISM Code;
  4. REQUESTS the Maritime Safety Committee and the Marine Environment Protection Committee to develop Guidelines for the implementation of the ISM Code;
  5. REQUESTS ALSO the Maritime Safety Committee and the Marine Environment Protection Committee to keep the Code and its associated Guidelines, under review and to amend them, as necessary;
  6. REVOKES resolution A.680(17).

The International Safety Management (ISM) Code Annex to IMO Assembly Resolution A.741(18) – 1993 PREAMBLE

  1. The purpose of this Code is to provide an international standard for the safe management and operation of ships and for pollution prevention.
  2. The Assembly adopted resolution A.443(XI) by which it invited all Governments to take the necessary steps to safeguard the shipmaster in the proper discharge of his responsibilities with regard to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment.
  3. The Assembly also adopted resolution A.680(17) by which it further recognized the need for appropriate organization of management to enable it to respond to the need of those on board ships to achieve and maintain high standards of safety and environmental protection.
  4. Recognizing that no two shipping companies or shipowners are the same, and that ships operate under a wide range of different conditions, the Code is based on general principles and objectives.
  5. The Code is expressed in broad terms so that it can have a widespread application. Clearly, different levels of management, whether shore-based or at sea, will require varying levels of knowledge and awareness of the items outlined.
  6. The cornerstone of good safety management is commitment from the top. In matters of safety and pollution prevention it is the commitment, competence, attitudes and motivation of individuals at all levels that determines the end result.

1. GENERAL 1.1 Definitions 1.1.1 “International Safety Management (ISM) Code” means the International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention as adopted by the Assembly, as may be amended by the Organization.1.1.2 “Company” means the Owner of the ship or any other organization or person such as the Manager, or the Bareboat Charterer, who has assumed the responsibility for operation of the ship from the Shipowner and who on assuming such responsibility has agreed to take over all the duties and responsibility imposed by the Code.1.1.3 “Administration” means the Government of the State whose flag the ship is entitled to fly.1.2 Objectives 1.2.1 The objectives of the Code are to ensure safety at sea, prevention of human injury or loss of life, and avoidance of damage to the environment, in particular, to the marine environment, and to property.1.2.2 Safety management objectives of the Company should, inter alia:

  • provide for safe practices in ship operation and a safe working environment;
  • establish safeguards against all identified risks; and
  • continuously improve safety management skills of personnel ashore and aboard ships, including preparing for emergencies related both to safety and environmental protection.

1.2.3 The safety and management system should ensure:

  • compliance with mandatory rules and regulations; and
  • that applicable codes, guidelines and standards recommended by the Organization, Administrations, classification societies and maritime industry organizations are taken into account.

1.3 Application

  1. The requirements of this Code may be applied to all ships.
  2. 1.4 Functional requirements for a Safety Management System (SMS)
  3. Every Company should develop, implement and maintain a Safety Management System (SMS) which includes the following functional requirements:
  • a safety and environmental protection policy;
  • instructions and procedures to ensure safe operation of ships and protection of the environment in compliance with relevant international and flag State legislation;
  • defined levels of authority and lines of communication between, and amongst, shore and shipboard personnel;
  • procedures for reporting accidents and non-conformities with the provisions of this Code;
  • procedures to prepare for and respond to emergency situations; and
  • procedures for internal audits and management reviews.

2. SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION POLICY

2.1 The Company should establish a safety and environmental protection policy which describes how the objectives, given in paragraph 1.2, will be achieved.2.2 The Company should ensure that the policy is implemented and maintained at all levels of the organization both ship based as well as shore based.

3. COMPANY RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY

3.1 If the entity who is responsible for the operation of the ship is other than the owner, the owner must report the full name and details of such entity to the Administration.3.2 The Company should define and document the responsibility, authority and interrelation of all personnel who manage, perform and verify work relating to and affecting safety and pollution prevention.3.3 The Company is responsible for ensuring that adequate resources and shore based support are provided to enable the designated person or persons to carry out their functions.

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4. DESIGNATED PERSON(S) To ensure the safe operation of each ship and to provide a link between the company and those on board, every company, as appropriate, should designate a person or persons ashore having direct access to the highest level of management.

    5.1 The Company should clearly define and document the master’s responsibility with regard to:

    • implementing the safety and environmental protection policy of the Company;
    • motivating the crew in the observation of that policy;
    • issuing appropriate orders and instructions in a clear and simple manner;
    • verifying that specified requirements are observed; and
    • reviewing the SMS and reporting its deficiencies to the shore based management.

    5.2 The Company should ensure that the SMS operating on board the ship contains a clear statement emphasizing the Master’s authority. The Company should establish in the SMS that the master has the overriding authority and the responsibility to make decisions with respect to safety and pollution prevention and to request the Company’s assistance as may be necessary.

6. RESOURCES AND PERSONNEL

    6.1 The Company should ensure that the master is:

    • properly qualified for command;
    • fully conversant with the Company’s SMS; and
    • given the necessary support so that the Master’s duties can be safely performed.

    6.2 The Company should ensure that each ship is manned with qualified, certificated and medically fit seafarers in accordance with national and international requirements.6.3 The Company should establish procedures to ensure that new personnel and personnel transferred to new assignments related to safety and protection of the environment are given proper familiarization with their duties. Instructions which are essential to be provided prior to sailing should be identified, documented and given.6.4 The Company should ensure that all personnel involved in the Company’s SMS have an adequate understanding of relevant rules, regulations, codes and guidelines.6.5 The Company should establish and maintain procedures for identifying any training which may be required in support of the SMS and ensure that such training is provided for all personnel concerned.6.6 The Company should establish procedures by which the ship’s personnel receive relevant information on the SMS in a working language or languages understood by them.6.7 The Company should ensure that the ship’s personnel are able to communicate effectively in the execution of their duties related to the SMS.

7. DEVELOPMENT OF PLANS FOR SHIPBOARD OPERATIONS

The Company should establish procedures for the preparation of plans and instructions for key shipboard operations concerning the safety of the ship and the prevention of pollution. The various tasks involved should be defined and assigned to qualified personnel.

8. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

8.1 The Company should establish procedures to identify, describe and respond to potential emergency shipboard situations.8.2 The Company should establish programmes for drills and exercises to prepare for emergency actions.8.3 The SMS should provide for measures ensuring that the Company’s organization can respond at any time to hazards, accidents and emergency situations involving its ships.

9. REPORTS AND ANALYSIS OF NON-CONFORMITIES, ACCIDENTS AND HAZARDOUS OCCURRENCES

9.1 The SMS should include procedures ensuring that non-conformities, accidents and hazardous situations are reported to the Company, investigated and analyzed with the objective of improving safety and pollution prevention.9.2 The Company should establish procedures for the implementation of corrective action.

10. MAINTENANCE OF THE SHIP AND EQUIPMENT

    10.1 The Company should establish procedures to ensure that the ship is maintained in conformity with the provisions of the relevant rules and regulations and with any additional requirements which may be established by the Company.10.2 In meeting these requirements the Company should ensure that:

    • inspections are held at appropriate intervals;
    • any non-conformity is reported with its possible cause, if known;
    • appropriate corrective action is taken; and
    • records of these activities are maintained.

    10.3 The Company should establish procedures in SMS to identify equipment and technical systems the sudden operational failure of which may result in hazardous situations. The SMS should provide for specific measures aimed at promoting the reliability of such equipment or systems. These measures should include the regular testing of stand-by arrangements and equipment or technical systems that are not in continuous use.10.4 The inspections mentioned in 10.2 as well as the measures referred to 10.3 should be integrated in the ship’s operational maintenance routine.

11. DOCUMENTATION

    11.1 The Company should establish and maintain procedures to control all documents and data which are relevant to the SMS.11.2 The Company should ensure that:

    • valid documents are available at all relevant locations;
    • changes to documents are reviewed and approved by authorized personnel; and
    • obsolete documents are promptly removed.

    11.3 The documents used to describe and implement the SMS may be referred to as the “Safety Management Manual”. Documentation should be kept in a form that the Company considers most effective. Each ship should carry on board all documentation relevant to that ship.

12. COMPANY VERIFICATION, REVIEW AND EVALUATION

12.1 The Company should carry out internal safety audits to verify whether safety and pollution prevention activities comply with the SMS.12.2 The Company should periodically evaluate the efficiency and when needed review the SMS in accordance with procedures established by the Company.12.3 The audits and possible corrective actions should be carried out in accordance with documented procedures.12.4 Personnel carrying out audits should be independent of the areas being audited unless this is impracticable due to the size and the nature of the Company.12.5 The results of the audits and reviews should be brought to the attention of all personnel having responsibility in the area involved.12.6 The management personnel responsible for the area involved should take timely corrective action on deficiencies found.

13. CERTIFICATION, VERIFICATION AND CONTROL

13.1 The ship should be operated by a Company which is issued a document of compliance relevant to that ship.13.2 A document of compliance should be issued for every Company complying with the requirements of the ISM Code by the Administration, by an organization recognized by the Administration or by the Government of the country, acting on behalf of the Administration in which the Company has chosen to conduct its business. This document should be accepted as evidence that the Company is capable of complying with the requirements of the Code.13.3 A copy of such a document should be placed on board in order that the Master, if so asked, may produce it for the verification of the Administration or organizations recognized by it.13.4 A Certificate, called a Safety Management Certificate, should be issued to a ship by the Administration or organization recognized by the Administration. The Administration should, when issuing a certificate, verify that the Company and its shipboard management operate in accordance with the approved SMS.13.5 The Administration or an organization recognized by the Administration should periodically verify the proper functioning of the ship’s SMS as approved.

: The International Safety Management Code (ISM Code 1993)

What should the operator of powerboat a do when approaching a powerboat B?

Overtaking – A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following If you are overtaking another power-driven boat (B) from the stern (from behind), you are the give-way craft (A) and do not have the right-of-way. You must take early and substantial action to keep well clear of the other boat by altering your speed and direction. You should pass at a safe distance to the port (left) or starboard (right) sector of the other boat. However, if a safe route exists, you should always attempt to pass the boat on the starboard side.

What should the operator of boat a do when being approached by boat B?

Power-driven vessels crossing – When two power-driven vessels are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the way and shall, if such are the circumstances, avoid crossing ahead of the other vessel. The operator of a powerboat should maintain his course when being approached on his port side by another powerboat.

What is the first action required of a boat operator who is involved in a boating?

What Is the First Action of a Boat Operator Who Is Involved in a Boating Accident? – When a boating accident occurs, the boat operator has a legal responsibility to stop the vessel immediately at the scene of the accident. They also have a legal duty to assist anyone injured in the accident immediately unless doing so would put themselves or the vessel in danger.

Is the person who is responsible for the over all operation of the organization?

What Is a Chief Executive Officer (CEO)? – A chief executive officer (CEO) is the highest-ranking executive in a company. Broadly speaking, a chief executive officer’s primary responsibilities include making major corporate decisions, managing the overall operations and resources of a company, acting as the main point of communication between the board of directors and corporate operations.

What are the three responsibilities when it comes to driving?

A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following When you are issued a drivers license, you are also issued a great deal of responsibilities. You must continue to demonstrate your ability to drive safely on the road. If you fail to demonstrate this ability, you will be issued traffic tickets, or even have your license suspended or revoked.

  • A lot of responsibility comes with a drivers license,
  • You have to drive safely, obey the traffic laws, and respect the rights of other drivers.
  • Not only should you concentrate on your own driving, you should also be well aware of the other vehicles around you.
  • Driving safely also includes how and where you park your car.

Passengers in your car put their safety in your hands and expect you to drive safe as well. A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following A motor vehicle is capable of causing extensive property damage, injury, and death. You should handle any vehicle you drive with extreme caution and attention to detail. Being in control of your vehicle requires you to be familiar with how it works, including its limitations. You need to maintain your car with oil changes and tune-ups on a regular basis. A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following You also have a financial responsibility when it comes to driving. Every driver needs to have automobile insurance that covers any potential damages or injuries he or she causes. If a minor is issued a license, then the parent(s) or guardian(s) of that minor are responsible for any financial consequences.

  1. Finally, safe driving requires a good attitude.
  2. You shouldn’t be stressed, tired, or distracted; driving should be your only focus.
  3. You need to be both mentally and physically capable of controlling your vehicle.
  4. There are many consequences for neglecting any or all of these responsibilities, so make sure you know what they are and comply with them.

Before you proceed, consider these 2006 U.S. driving statistics:

42,642 people were killed in motor vehicle collisions a 2.0% decline from 2005 (43,510).An average of 117 persons died each day in motor vehicle collisions—one every 12 minutes.3,490 15- to 20-year-old drivers were killed and an additional 272,000 were injured in motor vehicle collisions.There were 4,784 pedestrian deaths.41% of all fatalities were alcohol-related.

NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) Fatality Analysis 2006.

What is the duty and responsibility of driver?

Responsibilities –

Deliver various items to different addresses as assigned. Stick to a schedule and be time-bound on the job. Follow the prescribed routes most convenient for delivery. Load and unload the vehicle as needed. Inspect, operate and maintain the vehicle and its cleanliness. Collect payments whenever necessary. Ensure the customer receives the package. Maintain a log of all deliveries and related information for reference and confirmation. Follow road safety rules and regulations.

What must operators have in order to operate a vessel in a safe manner?

Collisions can be prevented easily if every pleasure craft operator fulfills three major responsibilities.

  1. Practice good seamanship. It is the responsibility of every boat or PWC operator to:
    • Operate in a safe manner.
    • Take all necessary action to avoid a collision, taking into account the weather, vessel traffic, and limits of other vessels. Such action should be taken in time to avoid a collision and at a safe distance from other vessels.
    • Avoid endangering the safety of persons involved in any activity in any waters.
  2. Keep a proper lookout. Failing to keep a sharp lookout is the most common cause of collisions. The Collision Regulations require every operator to keep a proper lookout, using both sight and hearing, at all times. Watch and listen for other vessels, radio communications, navigational hazards, and others involved in water activities to be aware of the situation and the risk of collision.
  3. Maintain a safe speed. Safe speed is the speed that ensures you will have ample time to avoid a collision and can stop within an appropriate distance. According to the Collision Regulations, safe speed will vary depending on conditions such as wind, water conditions, currents, navigational hazards, visibility, surrounding vessels and traffic density, distance from shore, and boat manoeuvrability. Always reduce speed and navigate with extreme caution at night and when visibility is restricted.

What should you require from others who operate your vessel?

A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following You always should make sure that anyone operating your vessel understands his or her responsibilities as a driver and knows how to operate safely and responsibly. Before allowing others to operate your vessel:

Check that they meet the minimum age and boater education requirements for operation in your state. Make sure they know basic boating safety and navigation rules. Show them how to use the lanyard with the ECOS and require them to use it. Explain the importance of obeying “idle speed,” “headway speed,” and “slow, no wake” restrictions. Stress the need to keep a proper lookout for other boaters and hazards.

What does a compliance notice ensure?

Compliance notice for a non-pleasure craft that is longer than 6 metres –

What is one of your responsibilities as the operator of a pleasure craft?

The operator of a pleasure craft has an obligation to stop and offer assistance when the operator is involved in an accident. He/she should watch for signals that show distress and need of assistance.

What is the responsibility of an operator that is involved in an accident with another vessel?

An operator involved in a boating accident must report the accident to the local police as soon as possible if the accident caused:

Death of any person or Injury to a person that requires hospitalization or Property damage exceeding $5,000.

Accidents must be reported in writing to the Minister of Transport within 14 days if the accident resulted in:

Injury to a person requiring medical treatment beyond first aid but not hospitalization or Property damage exceeding $2,500.

A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following Accident report forms are available on the Internet.

What are the responsibilities of a boat captain?

Ship Captain, Mates, and Pilots Career Video Transcript – A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following Seafaring is not just a career, it’s a lifestyle. Captains, mates, and ship pilots spend their days on the water on vessels of all sizes, on inland lakes and rivers, as well as the open sea. The captain is responsible for every aspect of the voyage and vessel.

They set course and speed, direct crew members, and ensure that proper procedures are followed, keeping logs and records of the ship’s movements and cargo, and supervising the loading and unloading of cargo and passengers. Mates are the captain’s “right hand.” They manage and train the deck crew, inspect and maintain inventory of equipment, and order needed repairs.

They stand watch, oversee ship operations, and navigation when the captain is not on duty. Pilots are responsible for steering ships in and out of berths, through hazardous conditions, and boat traffic. They motor out from harbor as a ship approaches, then climb aboard to take charge and safely berth the ship.

  • Life aboard ship requires that one must be in good physical condition to tolerate the extremes of weather and irregular hours, and to be ready to respond to unexpected danger.
  • Captains and ship pilots are expected to have vocational training or an associate’s degree, while mates often have a high school diploma.

All require experience onboard ships. Licensing by the Coast Guard is required for work on ships registered in the U.S. If you can’t resist the call of the sea, you might set sail for a nautical career.

What are the duties and responsibilities of ships crew?

Crew structure on board merchant vessels – deck departmentStructura echipajului pe vasele comerciale Life on board of a vessel is very different from any other shore based jobs or organization. Each crew member has a precise rank and carries certain responsibilities in order to maintain the vessel operations successful. A Law Enforcement Officer May Require An Operator To Submit To Which Of The Following The Deck crew is in charge with the vessel navigation, watch keeping, maintaining the ship’s hull, cargo, gear and accommodation, taking care of the ship’s life saving and firefighting appliances. The deck department is also the one in charge with receiving, discharging and caring for cargo.

  • According to the vessel’s hierarchy, the deck officers are as follows: Master, Chief Officer, Second Officer, Third Officer and Deck Cadet (deck officer to be).
  • The supreme authority on board a merchant vessel is the Master,
  • The entire crew is under his command.
  • He is responsible for the safety, use and maintenance of the vessel and makes sure that every crew member carries out his work accordingly.

He is also in charge of the following: payroll, ship’s accounting, inventories, custom and immigration regulations, and the ship’s documentation. In order to become Master, a seafarer must first have several years of experience as a deck officer and as Chief Officer.

According to the vessel’s hierarchy, the first deck officer and the head of the deck department after the Master is the Chief Officer or Chief Mate, He is in charge with the vessel navigation, watch duties, charging and discharging operations. The Chief Officer also directs all the other officers on deck, creates and posts watch assignments and implements the Master’s orders in order to maintain safe operations and maintenance of the vessel.

Second Officer or Second Mate is the next in rank after the Chief Mate and is the ship’s navigator, focusing on creating the ship’s passage plans and keeping charts and publications up to date. Apart from watch keeping, the Second Officer may also be designated to train the cadets on board or to fulfill the rank of security, safety, environmental or medical officer.

  • The Third Officer or Third Mate is the fourth deck officer in command and is usually the Ship’s Safety Officer, responsible with ensuring the good functioning of the fire-fighting equipment and life saving appliances.
  • He undertakes bridge watches and learns how to become a Second Officer.
  • A Cadet on board a merchant vessel receives structured training and experience on board and learns how to become a deck officer.

Apart from the officers, the deck department crew also consists of ratings, such as AB (Able Body Seaman), OS (Ordinary Seaman) and Boatswain. The AB is part of the deck crew and has duties such as: taking watches, steering the vessel, assisting the Officer on watch, mooring and unmooring the vessel, deck maintenance and cleaning.

  • The AB also secures and unsecures the cargo and carries our deck and accommodation patrols.
  • OS is the crew member whose main duty is to maintain the cleanliness of the whole ship and serves as assistant for the AB.
  • Being an OS is considered to be an apprenticeship, a period called “sea time” in order to be allowed to take courses and training for AB.

Both AB and OS are usually supervised by a Boatswain, who is also a rating, in charge with examining the cargo-handling gear and lifesaving equipment as well. The Boatswain usually holds an AB certificate as well. The structure for the deck department on board merchant vessels is mainly the same on all vessel types.

Nedcon Maritime recruits deck officers and rating for various vessel types such as general cargo, bulk, container vessels, tankers, offshore vessels etc. Our database consists of highly trained crew members who, apart from the usual requirements, have a series of other qualifications such as: AB Crane Operator, AB Cook, DP Officers etc.

: Crew structure on board merchant vessels – deck departmentStructura echipajului pe vasele comerciale