According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device?

According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device
Law Section 73.3. Any youth under the age of 12 on boats 65 feet or less in length must wear a securely fastened U.S. Coast Guard approved personal floatation device of appropriate size.

Who is required to wear a USCG approved personal flotation device?

State Boating Laws

State Which persons in your state are required to wear a PFD and under what circumstances? What are the penalties for violating PFD regulations in your state?
Alabama 1)all children under the age of 8 while onboard any vessel unless in an enclosed cabin or enclosed sleeping area regardless of whether the vessel is in operation 2)all persons on a vessel within 800 feet below a hydroelectric dam and/or navigation lock and dam 3) anyone operating or riding as a passenger on a pwc 4) anyone being towed on water skis, surfboard, dics, spinners, tubes or other similar devices. referencing above, violation of 1)$100; violation of 2)$50; violation of 3)$25; violation of 4)$50
Alaska Under 13 when in open boats or on open decks or when water skiing $100 for under 13 violation $100 for type IV violation $100 for first PFD carriage violation and $50 for each additional person
American Samoa All on board while boat is underway. $1000 fine
Arizona All children 12 years of age and younger must wear a U.S. Coast Guard–approved Type I, II, or III life jackets (PFDs) while underway on any vessel. The life jackets (PFDs) must be fastened according to the manufacturer’s recommended use and must fit the child properly.
Arkansas Anyone 12yrs old or younger must wear a PFD at all times. The only exception is when they are within the enclosed area of a houseboat or cruiser, or within the area enclosed by railings on a party barge, cruiser or houseboat – while the boat is NOT underway. $100 to $250
Australia
British Columbia
California Age 12 and younger on vessels less than 26 ft in length or in enclosed cabin or tethered to the mast fo a sailboat, All water-skiers and PWC operators, unless competing in sanctioned races or exhibition Violations are infractions, with fine of not nore than $150
Colorado persons aboard a PWC, water skiers or persons engaged in similar activities, children less than 13 YOA unless such child is below deck or in an enclosed cabin, persons participating in a regulated river trip provided by a river outfitter unless such river trip is on designated flatwater $50.00, except for regulated river trips which have a minimum penalty of $100.00
Connecticut All people under 12 years old except when below decks – anyone being towed behind a vessel – all people on pwc’s Fine $75.
Delaware all children 13 and younger 25 dollar fine
District of Columbia When the operator of a vessel sixteen feet (16 ft.) or more in length is under eighteen (18) years of age, the operator and all other persons aboard the vessel who are under eighteen (18) years of age shall wear a Coast Guard approved personal floatation device of the proper size. All persons aboard any vessel in the area from the southernmost point of the cove commonly known as Fletcher’s Cove in the Georgetown Channel of the Potomac River upstream to the District of Columbia boundary line at Little Falls shall wear a Coast Guard-approved personal floatation device at all times. No person may operate a recreational vessel underway with any child under thirteen years old aboard, unless each child is below the deck, in an enclosed cabin or wearing a US Coast Guard approved personal floatation device. Criminal Citation for violation of DCRM 19, Chapter 10, Section 26. $50.00 fine
Florida Children under 6 years of age must wear a USCG-approved Type I, II or III PFD at all times while on any vessel less than 26 feet in length that is underway. In addition, each person on board a PWC, and anyone being towed behind a vessel must wear a USCG-approved PFD. Non-criminal infraction, with a $50 – $80 fine, depending on the county where the violation occurs.
Georgia Children under 10 in an open vessel. All person in a designated Hazardous Area. Misdemeanor
Guam None Up to the court
Hawaii all children under the age of thirteen are required to wear a properly fitted personal flotation device whenever the vessel is underway on the ocean waters or navigable streams of the state or when moored or anchored offshore in a non-designated offshore mooring area, unless the children are below decks or in an enclosed cabin. §200-14 Violation of rules; penalty. (a) Any person who violates any rule adopted by the department under this part or who violates this part, shall be fined not more than $1,000 or less than $50 for each violation, and any vessel, the agents; owner, or crew of which violate the rules of the department or this part, shall be fined not more than $1,000 or less than $50 for each violation; provided that in addition to or as a condition to the suspension of the fines and penalties, the court may deprive the offender of the privilege of operating or mooring any vessel in state waters for a period of not more than thirty days. General administrative penalties. (a) Except as otherwise provided by law, the board is authorized to set, charge, and collect administrative fines and to recover administrative fees and costs, including attorney’s fees and costs, or bring legal action to recover administrative fines and fees and costs, including attorney’s fees and costs, or payment for damages or for the cost to correct damages resulting from a violation of subtitle 8 of title 12 or any rule adopted thereunder. Each day or instance of violation shall constitute a separate offense. (1) For a first violation or a violation beyond five years of a previous violation, a fine of not more than $5,000; (2) For a second violation within five years of a previous violation, by a fine of not more than $10,000; and: (3) For a third or subsequent violation within five years of the last violation, by a fine of not more than $15,000.
Idaho Youths aged 14 and younger on boats greater than 19 feet while underway. $84 infraction
Illinois Persons riding on PWC’s must wear and children under 13 years of age must wear while boat is under way. Petty Offense ($75.00)no more than $1,000.00.
Indiana Anyone operating, on or being towed by a PWC and anyone under the age of 13 yrs on waters of concurrent jurisdiction. Class C Infraction Maximum $500.00 fine
Iowa Those persons being towed on waterskis, surfboards or similar devices and operators and passengers on PWC’s. Simple misdemeanor. Fines=$ 20.00 and costs =$56.40 for a total of $ 76.40.
Kansas any child under the age of 13 while on board a vessel Class C misdemeanor fine amount between 0 and 500 dollars set by the court
Kentucky All persons under the age of 12 years in an open boat or on an open deck of a vessel being used for recreational purposes while the vessel is underway. $50.00 plus court costs
Louisiana right now 13 years and under Criminal
Maine Children 10 years of age and under. Anyone operating or riding on a PWC. Any person being towed on water-skies. Certain whitewater areas. Canoeing or kayaking on the Saco River between January 1st and June 1st between the Hiram Dam and the Atlantic Ocean. Civil Violation $100 fine
Manitoba (Canada)
Maryland All children under the age of 7 must wear a pfd while on a recreational vessel under 21′ in lenght while underway. This requirement does not apply when the vessel is moored,anchored or in an enclosed cabin or below deck. Fines, which rise with every additional pfd not on board a vessel
Massachusetts All PWC users All waterskiiers (persons being towed) Youths less than 12 yoa,when above board Canoeists/kyakers from mid-September thru mid-May. $50 fine.
Michigan All vessels must be equipped with a personal flotation device for each person on board. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) requires that all vessels have at least one Type I, II, or III personal flotation device that is USCG—approved, wearable, and of the proper size for each person on board. Sizing for PFDs is based on body weight and chest size. Michigan’s PFD law permits a vessel that is less than 16 feet long, or is a canoe or kayak, to choose to have either a wearable PFD (Type I, II, or III) or a throwable PFD (Type IV) for each person on board. In addition to the above requirements, one Type IV USCG—approved PFD must be on board vessels 16 feet or longer and readily accessible. Michigan law requires all children under 6 years of age to wear a USCG—approved Type I or II PFD when riding on the open deck of any vessel. Each person riding on or towed behind a PWC must wear a U.S. Coast Guard—approved Type I, II, or III personal flotation device. Inflatable PFDs are not allowed on PWCs. All PFDs must be in good and serviceable condition and must be readily accessible. A person who violates this section is responsible for a state civil infraction and may be ordered to pay a civil fine of not more than $100.00 for a child 6 yrs. and under violation. For all other violations a person may be ordered to pay a civil fine of not more than $500.00. History: Add.1995, Act 58, Imd. Eff. May 24, 1995 ;- Am.2007, Act 8, Imd. Eff. May 11, 2007
Minnesota PWC riders and passengers. Children under ten. $1,000 max and or 90 days in jail.
Mississippi Under the age of 13 must wear PFD anytime other than when boat is anchored or docked $25 to $ plus court cost100
Missouri All operators and passengers on PWCs. And anyone under age 7 on board any vessel, unless they are inside a totally enclosed area of the boat such as the cabin area of a house boat or day cruiser. Not more than one year in jail and/or $1,000 fine.
Montana persons under 12 are required to wear a PFD while the vessel is in motion Misdemeanor and shall be punishable by a fine of not less than $15 or more than $500 or by inprisonment for a term up to 6 months, or both
Nebraska All persons under age 13. All persons on PWC regardless of age. $50 fine
Nevada Persons under age 13
New Hampshire 12 years of age and younger while boat in motion, anyone being towed behind a vessel. Operator of a ski craft. Fine up to $60.00
New Jersey Children under 13YOA all on PWC all water skiers Summons/fine $25 to $100 + court cost
New Mexico Mandatory wear for all canoes, kayaks, rafts, PWC operator and passengers on all waters of the state. Mandatory wear for those 12 years of age and younger at all times when vessel is underway with exception of being inside the cabin. You may be held guilty of a petty misdemeanor by the county magistrate judge. This is punished by a fine of not less than $50 nor more than $500 or by imprisonment for not more than 30 days or both. The court may also impose court costs. (31-19-1 NMSA 1978) The judge may also elect to deferr or suspend the sentence and place the defendant on probation.
New York 1. Anyone 10. Any violation of the provisions of this section, or of a rule or regulation adopted pursuant to this section, shall constitute a violation punishable by a fine of not less than twenty-five nor more than one hundred dollars.
North Carolina No person shall operate a personal watercraft on the waters of this State, nor shall the owner of a personal watercraft knowingly allow another person to operate that personal watercraft on the waters of this State, unless: (1) Each person riding on or being towed behind the vessel is wearing a type I, type II, type III, or type V personal flotation device approved by the United States Coast Guard. Inflatable personal flotation devices do not satisfy this requirement No person may use a recreational vessel unless each child under 13 years old on board is wearing an appropriate PFD approved by the Coast Guard unless: Each child not wearing such a PFD is below decks or in an enclosed cabin. The vessel is not underway. (Vessels that are anchored or tied to shore are not underway.) This law does not apply to commercial vessels. Class three misdemeanor with $25.00 fine plus cost of court. ($135.00 currently)
North Dakota It is unlawful for any person to operate or to be a passenger on any vessel less than twenty-seven feet in lenght unless all persons, ten years of age and younger present on the vessel wear an appropriately sized and properly fastened USCG approved type I, II or III wearable PFD while the vessel is in operation.
Northern Mariana Islands None None
Ohio Children less than 10 on a vessel less than 18 feet in length and all PWC operators must wear a PFD. A 4th degree misdemeanor(M4). Sking without a PFD is a Minor misdemeanor(MM).
Oklahoma Any person 12 YOA or younger who is a passenger on a vessel less than 26 feet in length shall wear a proper PFD. Any person operating or manipulating, or who is a passenger on a PWC, water skis, sailboard, parasail or similar devices shall wear a proper PFD. $201
Ontario (Canada)
Oregon Children 12 years and younger are required to wear a USCG approved PFD while on an open deck or cockpit of a vessel that is underway or when the child is being towed. Class B Violation; fines for non-accident are $237 and for accident $273.
Pennsylvania Children 12 years of age and younger shall wear an approved Type I, II, III or V PFD while underway on any boat 20 feet or less in length and all canoes and kayaks. Anyone onboard a PWC or a sailboard must wear a PFD. Anyone being pulled behind a boat must wear a PFD. $50
Puerto Rico Any child under 12 in a vessel while moving. All users of a PWC. $50.00 fine
Quebec (Canada)
Rhode Island children under the age of 13 when under way on a vessel under 65 ft unless below decks. operator and passengers on PWC $100
South Carolina Children under 12 years of age in a Class A motorboat must wear a PFD at all times. Any person operating a PWC, or waterskiing must wear a PFD. Must be fined not less tha 25 dollars nor more than 200 dollars.
South Dakota Children under the age of seven. Class II misdemeanor – maximum penalty of $100 and 30 days in county jail.
Tennessee All persons 12 years of age and under. All operators/pasengers and persons being towed by PWC’s A fine of not more than 50 dollars
Texas Passengers younger than 13 years of age while underway; PWC operators and passengers at all times. $25-$500 fine
Utah *Persons less than 13 years of age while outside the cabin of vessel 19 feet or more *All persons on board a PWC *All persons on rivers, except on designated flatwater sections Class B Misdeamenor, Max. $1,000 or 6 months in jail
Vermont Childen under the age of 12 while underway on an open deck are required to wear a PFD. Any person on board a PWC and any person under 16 while on a sailboard. Fine up to $84.00.
Virgin Islands
Virginia All operators and passengers of PWCs Maximum $250 fine
Washington All persons on a PWC; any person 12 years of age or less on vessel under 19′ in length. Infraction violation that must be witnessed by law enforcement officer. Fine amount: $87.00.
West Virginia Anyone 12 and under on an open deck while the vessel is underway. All persons on PWCs and all water skiers. Minimum $20 plus $168 court costs
Wisconsin PWC operators and riders $148.20
Wyoming skiers, any person being towed on a water toy, and as of Jan 1, 2008 children 12 and under will have to wear them when on a boat that is underway, if they’re not in an enclosed cabin or below deck. $110.00

What are the 4 situations you must wear a PFD in New York State?

State Laws for Life Jackets – According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device ALABAMA: Children under 8 are required to wear PFDs in Alabama at all times unless they’re in an enclosed cabin. Keep in mind that federal law states children under 13 must wear life jackets. Boaters on jet skis and other personal watercraft are also required to wear them, as are those being towed on skis or in a tube.

  • Also, you need to wear one if you’re within 800 feet below a dam.
  • Depending on which violation occurs, fines range from $25 to $100.
  • ALASKA: Anyone who is 13 or under must wear a life jacket in Alaska.
  • This is when you are on the open deck, underway, or being towed.
  • Violators face a variety of fines that start at $100.

Additional fines will be added for each violation. AMERICAN SAMOA: When a boat is underway in American Samoa, everyone is required to have a life jacket on. The penalty for violating this is a $1000 fine. ARIZONA: Children 12 and under must wear a PFD at all times.

Water skiers and those on PWC must wear them also. ARKANSAS: Everyone 12 and under must wear a life jacket. The only time this is not so is when they are confined in an enclosed cabin or by railings on a boat not underway. Water skiers and those on PWC must also wear them. CALIFORNIA: Boaters age 12 and younger on vessels of any length must wear PFDs.

Or in an enclosed cabin or tethered to the mast of a sailboat, All water-skiers and PWC operators must wear them as well. That is unless competing in sanctioned races or exhibition. Fines can get up to $150. COLORADO: Children 12 years of age and younger are required to wear a PFD whenever their boat is on the water.

The exception is when they are in an enclosed cabin or below deck. Also PWC operators and passengers. Water skiers and persons on aquaplanes, surfboards and similar devices when towed behind a boat must wear some type of flotation. This does not necessarily have to be USCG approved. Expect fines of $50 or more for violations.

CONNECTICUT: Anyone under 12must wear a PFD. Skiers and PWC riders need them also. Between Oct.1 and May 30th, all people in canoes. Fines are $75. DELAWARE: Anyone riding a personal watercraft must wear a PFD. Likewise, children 12 and under need to wear one.

Fines start at $25. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: If a boat is 16 feet or more but the operator is 18 or under, everyone under 18 has to wear a PFD. Anyone 12 or under unless they’re below deck or in a cabin must wear one at all times. Finally, anyone on any vessel in the area from the southernmost point of Fletcher’s Cove in the Georgetown Channel of the Potomac River upstream to the District of Columbia boundary line at Little Falls must wear a Coast Guard-approved personal floatation device at all times.

Fines are $50. FLORIDA: Children under 6 on vessels less than 26 feet must wear an approved life jacket while underway. Federal laws state that the age is 13. Also all PWC operators and water skiers need one. Fines start at $50 but can go up. GEORGIA: Anyone using a PWC and water skiers.

  1. Also, boaters in designated “hazardous areas” must wear life jackets.
  2. Finally, children below 10 in a moving vessel, except when enclosed in a cabin.
  3. Violation is considered a misdemeanor.
  4. GUAM: Only PWC and water skiers are required to wear PFDs.
  5. Fines for violations are at the court’s discretion.
  6. HAWAII: Children 12 or under must wear a life jacket on a vessel operating or anchored offshore.

Fines can range from $50 to $1000. Subsequent fines after a first can get up to $5000 and then additional violations can rise as high as $15,000. IDAHO: In a boat 19 feet in length or less, children 14 years of age and younger must wear an approved PFD while the vessel is underway.

Also, those running PWCs and being towed must wear one as well. Fly fishing pontoons require them as well. Fines start at $84. ILLINOIS: Children under 13 must wear life jackets. Those riding PWCs must wear them as well. Fines start at $75. INDIANA: Children under 13 must wear life jackets when a boat is being operated.

It’s also required on PWC or when being towed. Fines can reach $500. IOWA: All children under 13 must wear a PFD in Iowa. Also, anyone operating a PWC or being towed must wear one as well. Fines add up to around $76. KANSAS: Kids 12 and under have to wear a life jacket on any vessel in Kansas.

Those operating personal watercraft need them as well. Fines will be set by the court and can reach $500. KENTUCKY: People on PWC must wear PFDs. Also children under 12. Fines are $50. LOUISIANA: If a vessel is under 26 feet and underway, all children under 16 must wear a PFD. Also, anyone operating a personal watercraft.

Violations are a criminal offense. MAINE : Children 10 or under must wear a PFD when a vessel is underway. Federal law says the age is 13, however. Those being towed on using PWC must wear them as well. Fines are $100. MARYLAND: Those on personal watercraft and water skiers must wear PFDs.

  1. Also, children under 13 must wear them when a vessel is underway.
  2. Fines can vary.
  3. MASSACHUSETTS: State law requires anyone being towed, PWC users, canoeists/kayakers from mid-September to mid-May to all wear PFDs.
  4. Children 12 and under must wear them also.
  5. Fines are $50.
  6. MICHIGAN: Michigan law requires all children under 6 must wear an approved PFD.

Water skiers and those on PWC must wear them as well. Fines for kids go up to $100. Others go up to $500. Federal law requires all children under 13 to wear a PFD. MINNESOTA : All children under 10 must wear a PFD when the vessel is underway. Keep in mind, federal law states the age as being 13 and not 10.

People on PWC as well. Fines can get up to $1000 and may include jail time. MISSISSIPPI: Kids 12 and under must wear one while the boat is underway. Also, anyone being towed or on a PWC needs one as well. Fines start at $25, MISSOURI: All children under 7 must wear a PFD. Also those operating PWC are required to as well.

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Fines can reach $1000 and there may be jail time. Federal regulations state any child under 13 must be wearing a PFD. Given that, you may want to double check before heading out which particular law holds precedence here. We suggest erring on the side of caution and ensuring all children are wearing a PFD.

  • MONTANA: Children 12 and under must wear a PFD on boats 26 feet and under that are underway.
  • Water skiers and PWC operators need them as well.
  • Fines are $15 to $500 and there may be jail time involved.
  • NORTH MARIANA ISLANDS: Water skiers and those operating PWC must wear life jackets.
  • NEBRASKA: Children under 13 must wear life jackets at all times except when hunting waterfowl in an anchored vessel.

PWC operators require them as well. Fines are $50. NEVADA: Kids 12 and under require life jackets. Likewise, operators of PWC need them. Fines can reach a maximum of $2000. NEW HAMPSHIRE: Kids 12 and under must wear a life jacket when the vessel is underway.

  • Those on PWC or being towed need them as well.
  • Fines get up to $60.
  • NEW JERSEY: Children under 13 must wear a PFD unless in an enclosed cabin.
  • Operators of PWC have to wear them as well.
  • Fines can range from $25 to $100.
  • NEW MEXICO: Children under 13 must be wearing a life jacket unless in a cabin when the boat is underway.

All boaters in kayaks, canoes, paddleboards, rubber rafts and PWC must also wear one. Fines can range from $50 to $500. There may also be jail time. NEW YORK: Anyone 12 or under on a boat under 65 feet must wear a PFD. Water skiers, those being towed and those on personal watercraft must also wear life jackets.

If you are in a boat less than 21 feet in length and it’s between November 1 and May 1 you must also wear a life jacket, regardless of age. Fines range from $25 to $100. NORTH CAROLINA: Those under 13 are required to wear a life jacket in North Carolina. If you’re being towed on the water or operating a personal watercraft you need to wear one as well.

Fines are just $25 but they add court costs and the end result is over $125, NORTH DAKOTA: If a boat is under 27 feet, then any passengers under 10 years of age need to wear a PFD. Also anyone being towed or in a PWC needs one as well. Federal law states a child under 13 must be wearing a PFD, however.

OHIO: Any child under 10 on a vessel under 18 feet long must be wearing a life jacket. Water skiers and PWC users need them also. Violation qualifies as a misdemeanor. Keep in mind, federal law places the age limit for wearing a PFD at under 13. OKLAHOMA: Children 12 or under on a 26 foot or under boat are required to wear a life jacket.

Those on PWC are required to wear them also. Fines are $201. OREGON: All children under 13 must wear a life jacket unless they are in an enclosed cabin or below decks. Likewise, people operating PWC must wear a life jacket. Fines are over $200. PENNSYLVANIA: Boaters must all wear life jackets on vessels under 16 feet from November 1 to April 30.

  • Boaters 12 and under must wear life jackets on any vessel under 20 feet including kayaks and canoes.
  • Anyone on a PWC or being towed must wear one as well.
  • Fines are $50.
  • PUERTO RICO: Children under 13 must wear a life jacket when a vessel is underway.
  • PWC operators are required to wear them as well.
  • RHODE ISLAND: children under 13 must wear a PFD unless in an enclosed cabin or below deck.

Anyone on a personal watercraft must wear one as well. Fines are $100. SOUTH CAROLINA: All children under 13 are required to wear a life jacket in a vessel under 16 feet that is underway. Likewise, anyone on a PWC must wear one. Fines can range from $25 to $200.

SOUTH DAKOTA : Children under 7 must wear a PFD at all times when operating at “slow, no wake” speeds unless in an enclosed cabin or below deck. Those operating PWC must wear them as well. Fines can get up to $100 but time in county jail is possible as well. Federal law states that the age is 13 so you may want to double check locally to ensure whether the 7 year old age limit is correct or if federal regulations apply.

TENNESSEE: Children 12 and under must be wearing a PFD. Also, A U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation device must be worn by each person on board vessels being operated within specifically marked areas below any dam. Finally, anyone being towed or on a PWC needs one also.

  • Fines are $50.
  • TEXAS: In a boat under 26 feet, all children under 13 must wear an approved PFD.
  • Also, anyone operating a PWC needs to wear a life jacket.
  • Fines can range from $25 all the way to $500.
  • UTAH: Children under 13 must wear a life jacket in Utah.
  • Also, if you are using a PWC or are being towed you need a life jacket.

Finally, on any river not designated a flatwater area, you’ll need a life jacket as well. You can face a maximum fine of $1,000 and potential jail time for violations. VERMONT: Children under 12 must wear a PFD on an open deck. Children under 15 must wear them on sailboats.

Also, anyone being towed is required to wear a life jacket. Fines go up to $84. VIRGIN ISLANDS: Water skiers and those on PWC are required to wear life jackets. VIRGINIA: People using PWCs must wear life jackets. Children 13 and under must wear a life jacket unless below deck or in a secure cabin. Fines can get up to $250.

WASHINGTON: Children 12 and under must wear a PFD in Washington. Water skiers and PWC operators are required as well. Fines are $87. WEST VIRGINIA : All children 13 and under must wear life jackets. PWCs and those being towed need to wear them also. Fines start at $20 but will include court costs over $100.

Who must wear a USCG approved PFD at all times while underway on any vessel less than 26 feet in length?

Use this quick table for boating under the influence (BUI) limits, penalties, and life jacket age requirements from each state and territory in the United States. The US Coast Guard requires properly fitting life jackets be readily accessible and within reach of all passengers on board, along with a throwable floatation devi c e,

  • The table below includes s ome requirements f or life jacket s on human – powered vessels such as kayaks, stand-up paddleboard or other similar craft however for specific details, please check with your state for more details,
  • For children, the US Coast Guard requires that when a vessel is underway, children under 13 years of age must wear their life jacket.

Exceptions are for when the children are below deck or within an enclosed cabin. To learn how to choose the correct children’s life jacket that fits properly, click this link, Information on this table includes a link back to its source for each state an d boaters should check with the states where they intend to boat before heading out on the water to ensure that there have been no changes.

STATE OR TERRITORY BLOOD ALCOHOL LIMIT % BUI PENALTY LIFE JACKET AGE REQUIREMENT
Federal n/a n/a Federal Law requires that when a vessel is underway, children under 13 years of age must wear their life jacket. Exceptions for when below deck or within an enclosed cabin. State laws may vary.
Alabama ,08 Large fines and/or jail time plus suspension of operator’s certification. All persons under eight (8) years of age, on any vessel, must, at all times, wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation device that must be strapped, snapped, or zipped securely in place; except, that no personal flotation device should be required when inside an enclosed cabin or enclosed sleeping space.
Alaska ,08 Driving under the influence and the penalties for conviction also apply to boat operators. Persons under 13 must wear a life jacket when in an open boat, on the deck of a boat, or when being towed (i.e. tubing, waterskiing)
Arizona ,08 Th estate of Arizona’s operating under the influence (OUI) law mirrors the states vehicular driving under the influence DUI laws and penalties. All Vessels, including paddleboards and kayaks, must have at least one USCG-approved wearable life jacket for each person on board. The only exceptions are sailboards and certain racing shells. All children 12 years of aga and younger must wear a USCG-approved wearable life jacket while underway on the any vessel. the life jacket must be fastened according to the manufacturer’s recommended use and must fit the child properly.
Arkansas ,08 Upon a first conviction, a person will lose his or her driver’s license for a period of 6 months. In addition, jail and fine may be included. Children under 12 years old and younger must wear a USCG-approved PFD securely fastened to their person at all times while on any vessel. Except if the child is within the enclosed area of a houseboat or cruiser, or within the area enclosed by railing on a party barge, cruiser, or houseboat, and the vessel is not underway.
California ,08 or less Operating a vessel while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs is a misdemeanor and could carry a penalty of one year in the county jail, or a fine, or both. No person may operate or give permission to operate a vessel sixteen feet or more in length unless at least one wearable personal flotation device is on board for each person, plus at least one throwable personal flotation device, which is immediately available. Under state law, it is an infraction, punishable by a fine of up to $250, to operate a vessel of any length unless every child under 13 years of age on board is wearing a Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
Colorado ,08 It is a misdemeanor for any person to operate or be in actual physical control of a vessel in this state while Under the influence of alcohol; any controlled substance; any combination of alcohol and any controlled substance. requires all operators and passengers to wear U.S. Coast Guard approved life jackets and requires operators to use a lanyard switch. children 12 years of age and younger are required to wear a PFD whenever their vessel is on the water, except when they are in an enclosed cabin or below deck.
Connecticut ,08 The penalty for a first violation may be: a fine; suspension of boating privileges, jail, probation, and or hours community service Be worn by children under 13 years old on any vessel that is underway unless the child is below deck or in an enclosed cabin. Be worn by anyone in a manually propelled vessel from October 1 through May 31.
Delaware ,08 Fines, imprisoned, or both. Every operator of a recreational boat shall be responsible for providing for the protection of any child 12 years of age or under by having any such child who is aboard a recreational boat upon the waters of this State, properly wear a Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device which is in good serviceable condition and of the proper size. This section shall not apply to any child who is below deck or in an enclosed cabin or while said recreational boat is anchored or moored.
Florida ,08 A person is guilty of the offense of boating under the influence is subject to fines, imprisonment, or both. A person may not operate a vessel less than 26 feet in length on the waters of this state unless every person under 6 years of age on board the vessel is wearing a personal flotation device currently approved by the United States Coast Guard and used in accordance with the United States Coast Guard approval label while such vessel is underway. For the purpose of this section, “underway” means at all times except when a vessel is anchored, moored, made fast to the shore, or aground.
Georgia ,08 Those arrested for boating under the influence may lose their privilege to operate a boat or PWC until they successfully complete a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program; and will also be charged with a misdemeanor punishable by fines and/or prison time. All vessels must have a least one US Coast Guard USCG-approved Type I, II, III, or V person flotation device (PFD), sometimes called life jacket, for each person on board. Type V PFDs are acceptable only when worn and securely fastened. Children under 13 years old are required to wear a USCG-approved PFD while on board any moving vessel. Except if the child is in a fully enclosed cabin.
Hawaii ,08 Violations may be subject to fines and fees. Children 12 years of age and under must wear a personal flotation device (PFD) while aboard a vessel operating or anchored offshore.
Idaho ,08 BUI is a misdemeanor and can include time in jail and/or a fine; and to attend and successfully complete a course on safe boating. Children 14 and under must wear an approved life jacket when they are aboard a boat 19 feet in length or less whenever the boat is underway or under power. This applies to manually propelled boats such as canoes and rafts in addition to powerboats, sailboats, personal watercraft (jet skis) and fishing float tubes.
Illinois ,08 operating under the influence (OUI) is a Class “A” misdemeanor and can included jail and fines. All vessels must have at least one U.S. Coast Guard (USCG)–approved wearable personal flotation device (PFD), sometimes called life jacket, for each person on board or being towed. All vessels 16 feet or longer, except canoes and kayaks, also must carry one USCG–approved throwable PFD. All children under the age of 13 must wear a PFD on vessels less than 26 feet in length when underway, unless they are below decks in an enclosed cabin or on a vessel operating on private property.
Indiana ,08 A first offense may lose all their driving privileges (motorized boat and motor vehicle), penalties and fines. Children under 13 years of age are required to wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket when underway on any boat.
Iowa ,08 Boating under the influence violations will be subject to fines, Imprisonment, and a loss of operating privileges. A person shall not operate a vessel in Iowa unless every person on board the vessel who is age 12 and under is wearing a U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket. A life jacket must be worn when the vessel is underway, which means when a vessel is not at anchor, tied to a dock or the bank/shore or aground. A child age 12 and under in an enclosed cabin, below deck, or aboard a commercial vessel with a capacity of 25 persons or more is exempt.
Kansas ,08 Violations can include imprisonment, a fine or both. Anyone12 years old and youngermust wear a life jacket at all times when on board a boat or being towed behind the boat on skis or a tube.
Kentucky ,08 Under the influence of any substance that impairs the operator’s driving ability may be subject to fines and possible jail time. Persons under 12 years of age must wear a PFD while in the open part of a boat that is under way.
Louisiana ,08 Penalties include suspension or revocation of boating privileges and driver’s license. Children 16 years of age and younger are required to wear a USCG-approved PFD while underway on a vessel less than 26 feet long.
Maine ,08 Penalties include fine, imprisonment, or both. Children 10 years of age and younger are required to wear a USCG-approved PFD at all times while on board a watercraft unless the watercraft is docked, anchored, or moored.
Maryland ,08 Violators subject to misdemeanor, fine, imprisonment, or both. All children under the age of 13 must WEAR a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket (Type I, II, III or V) while underway on a recreational vessel under 21 feet in length on Maryland waters.
Massachusetts ,08 Penalties include the loss of a motor vehicle driver’s license. Life preservers are required to be worn by: (1) youth less than 12 years of age (2) personal watercraft users (3) waterskiers (4) canoeists/kayakers from September 15 – May 15.
Michigan ,08 Boating under the influence violators are guilty of a misdemeanor, and or a felony. All children under 6 years of age to wear a USCG–approved Type I or II PFD when riding on the open deck of any vessel while underway.
Minnesota ,08 Violator subject to fines, fees, jail time, loss of boating privileges, and felony charges. Children under 10 years old are required to wear a properly fitted life jacket while a boat in underway.
Mississippi ,08 Fines, or imprisonment, and violator must complete a boating safety course. Anyone 12 years and younger must wear a Coast Guard approved Personal Flotation Device at all times while the vessel is underway.
Missouri ,08 A person commits the offense of boating while intoxicated if he or she operates a vessel while in an intoxicated condition. The offense of boating while intoxicated is a class B misdemeanor. Each person under the age of seven who is on board any watercraft shall wear a personal flotation device which is approved by the United States Coast Guard. This law does not apply when the person under the age of seven is in a part of a watercraft which is fully enclosed, where such enclosure will prevent such person from falling out of or being thrown from the watercraft.
Montana ,08 and less Subject to a fine or jail or both. Children under 12 years of age must wear a life jacket on a boat less than 26 feet in length that is in motion.
Nebraska ,08 Subject to a fine, or jail, the loss of boating privileges, and to attend an alcoholism treatment program. No child under 13 is allowed aboard any vessel when not wearing a Coast Guard-approved life preserver except when hunting waterfowl in an anchored boat. Operators shall be held responsible.
Nevada ,08 Subject to a fine, or jail, felony charges. Children under age 13.
New Hampshire ,08 Subject to class B misdemeanor, fines, boating privilege suspension, driver’s license suspension, anignition interlock device (IID), and or Impaired Driver Care Management Program. All children age 12 or under must wear an approved vest or jacket.
New Jersey ,08 Subject to fine, loss of the privilege to operate a vessel, forfeiture of your driver’s license. Any child 12 years of age or younger must WEAR a properly fitted U.S. Coast Guard approved PFD whenever the vessel is underway. If the child is inside a fully enclosed cabin that is a permanent, non-removable part of the vessel that is designed to carry passengers, then the child is not required to wear the PFD.
New Mexico ,08 Subject to jail, fines, boating safety course. A child age twelve or under who is aboard the vessel to wear a personal flotation device approved by the United States Coast Guard while the vessel is underway, unless the child is below deck or in an enclosed cabin.”
New York ,08 Subject to fines, imprisonment, suspension of operator privileges. Children under the age of 12 aboard pleasure vessels les than 65 feet in length, canoes, kayaks, or rowboats, unless in a totally enclosed cabin. Pleasure vessels less than 21 feet in length from November 1 to May 1.
North Carolina ,08 Subject to class 2 misdemeanors, a fine and or jail. No person may use a recreational vessel unless each child under 13 years old on board is wearing an appropriate PFD approved by the Coast Guard unless: Each child not wearing such a PFD is below decks or in an enclosed cabin. The vessel is not underway. (Vessels that are anchored or tied to shore are not underway.) This new law does not apply to commercial vessels.
North Dakota ,10 Subject to operator privileges may be revoked in addition to other penalties. All persons 10 years of age or younger present on the vessel, wear an appropriately sized and properly fastened U.S. Coast Guard approved type I, II or III wearable personal flotation device while the vessel is in operation.
Ohio ,08 Fine and or jail. Any child less than 10 years of age must wear a properly fitted life jacket.
Oklahoma ,08 A fine. Children under 13 years of age must wear a PFD whenever underway on a vessel less than 26 feet in length.
Oregon ,08 Losing boat privileges and fines. All children under 13 are required to wear a life jacket on boats less than 19 feet in length, unless in a fully enclosed area.
Pennsylvania ,02 Penalties include loss of boating privileges, significant fines and imprisonment. Children 12 years of age and younger on Commonwealth waters when underway on any boat 20 feet or less in length and in all canoes and kayaks.
Rhode Island ,08 Fines, fees, possible jail time, loss of operating privileges, and attendance at a boating safety course. A child under 13 years of age in a recreational vessel less than 65 feet (19.8 meters) in length on the waters of this state shall require that the child wear a wearable PFD approved by the U.S. Coast Guard while underway, unless below deck in a closed cabin.
South Carolina ,08 and less Subject to a fine, jail, community service, imprisonment, and suspension of boating privilege. Persons under the age of 12 must wear one at all times on vessels 16 feet in length or shorter.
South Dakota ,08 Subject to aclass 1 misdemeanor, fine, and or jail. Children on board under seven years of age is wearing as US Coast Guard approved PFD unless the chide is within a cable or below deck.
Tennessee ,08 A fine, jail, loosing operating privileges. Children 12 years of age and younger must wear a USCG-approved PFD at all times while on the open deck of a recreational vessel that is not anchored, moored, or aground.
Texas ,08 Fines and or jail. Children under 13 years of age in or on vessels under 26 feet must wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved wearable PFD while underway.
Utah ,08 and less (BUI) is the same as driving under the influence (DUI) and has the same penalties including suspension of driver license, possible jail time and fines. Passengers, 12-years-old and younger must wear a properly sized coast guard approved life jacket whenever a boat is in operation.
Vermont ,08 and less Subject to fines, jail time, or both; loss of operating privileges; and completion of an alcohol program. All boaters under the age of 12 must wear an approved U.S. Coast Guard Type I, II or III life jacket while underway on an open deck of any vessel. A person under 16 years of age a board a sailboard must be wearing a Type I, II, or III U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation device.
Virginia ,08 Fines, and or jail time, loss of operating privileges, attendance at an alcohol safety program any child under age 13 on the vessel unless each child is either: Wearing an appropriate life jacket approved by the Coast Guard; or Below deck or in an enclosed cabin.
Washington ,08 Fine and jail. Children ages 12 years and younger to wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket or vest on vessels less than 19 feet long.
West Virginia ,08 and less Subject to a misdemeanor and may receive a fine and time in jail, Children that are 12 years of age and under are required to wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket while on the deck of any boat that is underway.
Wisconsin ,08 Fine and or time in jail, and possible completion of a boating safety course Children under the age of 13 to wear a USCG-approved PFD while underway in an open vessel.
Wyoming ,10 Subject to a misdemeanor, time in jail, suspended boater’s operating privileges. Children 12 years of age and under are required to wear a life jacket while the watercraft is underway.
Washington District of Columbia ,08 Fine and or time in jail. Required when a vessel is underway, children under 13 years of age must wear their life jacket. Exceptions for when below deck or within an enclosed cabin. State laws may vary.
American Samoa Territory ,08 Revocation of motorboat license. Children 13 years of age and under are required to wear a life jacket while the watercraft is underway.
Guam Territory ,08 Revocation of motorboat license. Children 13 years of age and under are required to wear a life jacket while the watercraft is underway.
Northern Mariana Islands Territory n/a n/a n/a
Puerto Rico Territory n/a n/a Any child under 12 in a vessel while moving. All users of a PWC.
US Virgin Islands Territory n/a n/a n/a
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At what age must children wear a USCG life jacket?

Under California law, every child under 13 years of age on a moving recreational vessel of any length must wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket in serviceable condition and of a type and size appropriate for the conditions and the activity.

What is a requirement for the USCG approved inflatable PFD?

California Life Jacket laws & requirements – Under California boating laws all personal flotation devices must be readily accessible and one throwable flotation device must be immediately available, With the exception of kayaks and canoes, every vessel must carry one wearable U.S.

What age children must wear a USCG approved PFD while on board a vessel less than 65 feet long?

33 CFR 175.15(c) provides that no person may operate a recreational vessel underway with any child under 13 years old aboard unless each such child is either wearing an appropriate PFD approved by the Coast Guard or below decks or in an enclosed cabin.

Do you have to wear a PFD on a bass boat?

1. Inflatable PFDs – Do inflatable PFDs work reliably? Do they only work in certain conditions? Those are the main questions that were asked. After doing the research, Here’s the deal: You should NOT be wearing an inflatable PFD when it’s coldor when the water’s cold. Don’t believe it? Read your owner’s manual. It will probably say that when temps are below 40 degrees, the PFD inflates “very slowly” (with the CO2 cartridge). AND if that PFD is stored outside in your boat when air temps are below freezing, it may not work at all until the cylinder warms. It’s worth noting that inflatable PFDs “are not to be worn when the temperature is below freezing,” according to inflatable PFD maker Onyx Outdoors, unless the PFD “is partially inflated” manually. BUT that could cause another issues — check this out from a Mustang PFD owner’s manual : > When the temperature is below freezing, a fully discharged cylinder may not adequately inflate your PFD. Do not use your PFD under these conditions unless it is already partly inflated. Warning: CO2 inflation could over-pressurize and damage your PFD if already fully orally inflated. Above freezing, in cold temps, the PFD will inflate but will do so slowly — the colder, the slower. And it’s likely that a partially inflated PFD won’t support a fisherman in the water. In case you’re tempted to warm your PFD inside your jacket, the manufacturers say that an inflatable PFD should only be worn only on the outside of clothing or rainwear. We all know reports of PFDs failing to inflate when wearers were dumped in the water. Onyx says it rigorously investigated each situation involving its own PFDs : “We have not seen any issues of a properly armed and maintained automatic not inflating when needed,” said Wayne Walters, director of compliance for Onyx. In some of the cases Onyx investigated, fishermen were wearing manual PFDs — which means that the wearer has to manually trigger the inflation: If the cord isn’t pulled, the PFD won’t inflate. That might seem obvious, but fishermen who are used to wearing automatic inflatable PFDs may not realize that manual versions exist. According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device This means that when you put an inflatable on, it’s imperative that you check what kind it is as well as the status indicator of the PFD. To check whether or not the PFD is functional, you need to look at the bobbin — a moisture-sensing device found in the inflation mechanism. The bobbin has a date stamp on it and should be replaced every 3 years. Standard rearming procedures should be followed. How to maintain an inflatable PFD: > Routinely check the status indicator as well as the condition of the bladders, cover and webbing. It’s key to make sure there are no punctures, tears or worn spots in the bladder or cover. > Besides the visual inspection of the bladder and service indicator on the inflator, the PFD should be orally inflated every 2 months — especially so if it’s stored in a place where it can be inadvertently punctured by something like a hook. It should hold air for 2 hours or so after oral inflation. > Function and rearming of the automatic/manual PFD — more Onyx vids here : A few more things: > After the PFD has been inflated once, the CO2 cylinder must be replaced. > As is the case with all PFDs, inflatables need to fit the size of the person wearing it — check the sizes in your boat. > Don’t just take it out of the package and throw it in the boat: The webbing should be adjusted for a snug fit. > Onyx says people under the age of 16 should not wear an inflatable. When an inflatable is properly maintained (check the owner’s manual) and its “working conditions” are met, it should work fine — but again, cold weather/water makes it function slower or not at all. Concerns about inflatables Last year the Alabama Student Angler Bass Fishing Association banned the use of inflatable PFDs in its tournaments. “The benefits just don’t outweigh the risks,” says association president Barry Corbman. “We have been discussing this for several years, and this year we decided to end” the use of inflatables. “One of the reasons was the FLW accident at Okeechobee, and the other was something that happened in one of our tournaments,” he said. In the latter case, 2 anglers and a boat captain were ejected from a boat when it hit a wave wrong. He said each was wearing an inflatable PFD and “only 1 of those inflated.” “Fortunately the kill switch worked, and the people were able to get back in the boat. That probably was the only thing that saved them because they were well away from everyone. And it could have been really bad because was unconscious in the water.” The decision to ban inflatable PFDs was made shortly before a tournament, and because of the short notice a 1-tournament use was allowed after all PFDs were inspected. “We found several where the bobbin that pierces the CO2 cartridge was past its use-by date, several where the vests had been deployed and one where the cartridge was empty.” For them, inflatable PFDs were “just a gamble that we are”t willing to take,” he said. The ASABFA has over 2,000 members representing over 100 schools, some of which are middle schools — and inflatable PFDs are sized for adults and not for use by those under the age of 16, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. Both B.A.S.S. and FLW were aware of the decision of the ASABFA, but neither organization is enacting the same banyet. Last year B.A.S.S.’s Dave Precht said: “We’ve not made any changes. We are well aware of concerns, and our Elite advisory board will be discussing it. Currently we require all tournament anglers to wear USCG-approved PFDs, and that means that anglers under 16 years cannot use inflatable PFDs.” FLW PR director Joe Opager said last year that the ASABFA’s decision “will not influence any rule decision we make as an organization. We are constantly assessing our rules and policies across all of our tournament circuits to keep safety at the top of mind for anglers. At this time, Coast Guard-approved inflatable PFDs are allowed for anglers 16 years of age and older, per state law.” > For more information on PFDs and their appropriate uses, check out the Coast Guard’s classification of PFDs,

Which of the following equipment is required for motorized vessels operating in New York boat Ed?

Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs aka Life Jackets) – Every pleasure vessel including canoes, kayaks and rowboats operated upon the waters of NYS must have on board one United States Coast Guard approved wearable Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for each person on the vessel.

On which type of vessel must everyone on board wear a PFD?

Washington law requires the following with respect to PFDs.

All vessels (including non-motorized watercraft) must carry at least one USCG–approved wearable Type I, II, or III PFD for each person on board. Non-motorized watercraft include vessels such as canoes, inflatable rafts, kayaks, and sailboats. In addition to the above requirement, vessels 16 feet in length or longer must have one USCG–approved throwable Type IV device on board and immediately accessible. Canoes and kayaks are exempt from this requirement. All PFDs must be in good and serviceable condition and readily accessible. The wearable PFDs must be of the proper size for the intended wearer. Sizing for PFDs is based on body weight and chest size. Children 12 years old and younger must wear a USCG–approved wearable PFD at all times when underway in a vessel less than 19 feet in length, unless in a fully enclosed area. Each person on board a PWC must wear a USCG–approved wearable Type I, II, or III PFD. Each person being towed behind a vessel must wear a USCG–approved wearable Type I, II, or III PFD. A wearable Type V PFD may be substituted for other required PFDs if the wearable Type V PFD is approved for the activity for which the PFD is being used and is being worn. Some local governments have additional requirements for wearing PFDs. Before you go boating, be sure to check for local regulations at www.mrsc.org/codes.aspx,

According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device

When a boat less than 26 feet is underway properly sized PFDs must be worn by children of what age in Florida?

All vessels, with the exception of non-motor-powered vessels less than 16 feet in length, non-motor-powered canoes, kayaks, racing shells or rowing sculls, regardless of length, must be registered through your local Tax Collector’s Office, Letters must be separated from the numbers by a hyphen or space equal to letter width. The Certificate of Registration must be on board and available for inspection by an enforcement officer whenever the vessel is operated. Vessels must be registered and numbered within 30 days of purchase. Registration numbers must be displayed on the forward half of the vessel on both sides above the waterline. The numbers must be bold block letters at least 3″ high in a color contrasting to the hull. The vessel registration decal must be renewed annually and is to be displayed within 6 inches of, either before or after, the registration numbers on the port (left) side. Documented vessels without a state registration in full force and effect must also obtain a Florida registration and display the validation decal on the port side of the vessel when using Florida waters. Also see: flhsmv.gov

The operator of a vessel involved in a boating accident where there is personal injury beyond immediate first-aid, death, disappearance of any person under circumstances which indicate death or injury, or if there is damage to the vessel(s) and/or personal property of at least $2,000, must, by the quickest means possible, give notice to one of the following: the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the sheriff of the county in which the accident occurred, or the police chief of the municipality in which the accident occurred, if applicable. It is unlawful for any person operating a vessel involved in a boating accident to leave the scene without giving all possible aid to the involved persons and without reporting the accident to the proper authorities. Also see: FWC Boating Accident Statistics

Anyone who operates a vessel with willful disregard for the safety of persons or property will be cited for reckless operation (a first-degree misdemeanor). All operators are responsible for operating their vessel in a reasonable and prudent manner with regard for other vessel traffic, posted restrictions, the presence of a divers-down flag and other circumstances so as not to endanger people outside of the vessel or property. Failure to do so is considered careless operation (a non-criminal infraction). A violation of the Federal Navigation Rules is also a violation of Florida law.

Florida law requires that anyone convicted of 2 non-criminal boating safety infractions within a 12-month period must enroll in, attend and successfully complete any NASBLA/State of Florida-approved boater education course. (“Attend” means you must attend a classroom course or take the course on-line.) This course must be completed following the date of the second violation, and proof of completion must be filed with the Commission’s Boating and Waterways Section. Any person convicted of a boating infraction which resulted in a reportable boating accident or convicted of any criminal boating violation must complete any NASBLA/State of Florida-approved boating safety course and also complete an approved safe boating course for violators. Violator courses require approximately 4 hours to complete and must be taken through a specified State of Florida-approved online course. A violator’s privilege to operate a vessel in Florida is suspended until proof of course completion is filed with the FWC. Frequently Asked Questions

The exhaust of every engine used on any airboat operated in Florida must use an automotive-style factory muffler, underwater exhaust, or other manufactured device capable of adequately muffling the sound of the engine exhaust. The use of cutouts or flex pipe as the sole source of muffling is prohibited. Airboats must be equipped with a mast or flagpole displaying a flag that is at least 10 feet above the lowest part of the boat. The flag must be square or rectangular, at least 10 inches by 12 inches in size, international orange in color, and displayed so it is visible from any direction.

Any vessel operating in a speed zone posted as “Idle Speed – No Wake” must operate at the minimum speed that allows the vessel to maintain headway and steerageway. Any vessel operating in a speed zone posted as “Slow Down – Minimum Wake” must operate fully off plane and completely settled in the water. The vessel’s wake must not be excessive nor create a hazard to other vessels.

It is a violation of Florida law to operate a vessel while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. A vessel operator suspected of boating under the influence must submit to sobriety tests and a physical or chemical test to determine blood- or breath-alcohol content. In Florida, a vessel operator is presumed to be under the influence if their blood- or breath-alcohol level is at or above,08. Any person under 21 years of age who is found to have a breath-alcohol level of,02 or higher and operates or is in actual physical control of a vessel is in violation of Florida law.

The operator of a vessel towing someone on skis or another aquaplaning device must either have an observer, in addition to the operator, on board who is attendant to the actions of the skier or have and use a wide-angle rear-view mirror. No one may ski or aquaplane between the hours of 1/2 hour past sunset and 1/2 hour before sunrise. No one may water ski or use another aquaplaning device unless they are wearing a U.S. Coast Guard-approved non-inflatable wearable personal flotation device (PFD). Inflatable PFDs are prohibited for skiing/aquaplaning. No one may ski or use another aquaplaning device while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. The operator of a vessel towing a skier may not pull the skier close enough to a fixed object or another vessel that there is risk of collision.

Each person operating, riding on, or being towed behind a personal watercraft must wear an approved non-inflatable wearable personal flotation device (PFD). Inflatable PFDs are prohibited for personal watercraft use. The operator of a personal watercraft must attach the engine cutoff switch lanyard (if equipped by the manufacturer) to his/her person, clothing or PFD. Personal watercraft may not be operated from 1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise, even if navigation lights are used. Remember, both federal and state law requires the use of navigation lights from sunset to sunrise. Maneuvering a personal watercraft by weaving through congested vessel traffic, jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably close or when visibility around the vessel is obstructed, or swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision is classified as reckless operation of a vessel (a first-degree misdemeanor). A person must be at least 14 years of age to operate a personal watercraft in Florida. A person must be at least 18 years of age to rent a personal watercraft in Florida. It is unlawful for a person to knowingly allow a person under 14 years of age to operate a personal watercraft (a second-degree misdemeanor). Anyone born on or after January 1, 1988 is required to either have successfully completed a National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) approved boating education course or have passed a course equivalency or temporary certificate examination and have in their possession a boating education ID card and a photo identification card before operating a vessel with a motor of 10 HP or more in Florida. Identification cards for persons completing the course or the equivalency exam are good for a lifetime. Temporary Certificate exams are made available to the public through contractors. The temporary certificate is valid for 12 months from the issue date.

Except in the event of an emergency, it is unlawful to moor or fasten to any lawfully placed navigation aid or regulatory maker.

Anyone born on or after January 1, 1988 who operates a vessel powered by 10 horsepower or more must pass an approved boater safety course and have in his/her possession photographic identification and a boating safety education identification card issued by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The following operators are exempt:

A person licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard as a master of a vessel. A person operating on a private lake or pond. An operator who is accompanied onboard by a person who is least 18 years old and possesses the required Boating Safety Education Identification Card, provided that person is attendant to and responsible for the safe operation of the vessel. An operator who is accompanied onboard by a person who is exempt from the educational requirements, provided that person is attendant to and responsible for the safe operation of the vessel. A non-resident who has in his or her possession proof that he or she has completed a NASBLA-approved boater safety course or equivalency examination from another state. A person who is operating a vessel within 90 days after the purchase of that vessel, provided they have available for inspection aboard that vessel, a bill of sale meeting all the requirements as established in Chapter 328.46(1), Florida Statutes. A person operating a vessel within 90 days after completing an approved boating safety course, as required in Chapter 327.395(1), and has a photographic I.D. and a boater education course completion certificate showing proof of having completed the required boating safety education course. The course completion certificate must provide the student’s first and last name, date of birth, and the date the course was successfully completed. (Effective Oct.1, 2011.)

Please read our Frequently Asked Questions, See also Boat Safety Equipment, The following regulations apply whenever someone is wholly or partially submerged and is using a face mask and snorkel or underwater breathing apparatus. A divers-down warning device may be a divers-down flag, buoy, or other similar warning device.

The divers-down warning device must contain a divers-down symbol. The symbol is a red rectangle or square with a white diagonal stripe. If the symbol is a rectangle, the length may not be less than the height or more than 25% longer than the height. The width of the stripe must be 25% of the height of the symbol. If multiple stripes are displayed, all of the stripes must be oriented in the same direction. The size of the divers-down symbol depends on whether the divers-down warning device is displayed from the water or from a vessel. On the water, the divers-down symbol must be at least 12 x 12 inches in size. On a vessel, the symbol must be at least 20 x 24 inches in size. When displayed on a boat, the divers-down warning device also must be displayed at the highest point of the vessel so that its visibility is not obstructed in any direction. Divers-Down Instructions If the divers-down warning device is a flag, the divers-down symbol must be on each face and have a wire stiffener or be otherwise constructed to ensure it remains fully unfurled and extended, even when there is no wind or breeze. If the divers-down symbol is a buoy, the buoy must have three or four sides with the divers-down symbol displayed on each of the flat sides. The buoy must be prominently visible on the water’s surface and can’t displayed on the vessel. Boaters must make reasonable efforts to stay at least 300 feet away from divers-down warning devices in open water and at least 100 feet away in rivers, inlets, or navigation channels. Boaters approaching divers-down warning devices closer than 300 feet in open water and 100 feet in rivers, inlets, or navigation channels must slow down to idle speed. Divers-must make a reasonable effort to stay within 100 feet of a divers-down flag or a buoy within rivers, inlets, or navigation channels and within 300 feet on open water. A divers-down warning device may not be displayed when divers are out of the water.

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Except in the event of an emergency, it is unlawful for any person to anchor or operate a vessel in a manner that will unreasonably interfere with the navigation of other vessels

The owner and/or operator of a vessel is responsible to carry, store, maintain and use the safety equipment required by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). All vessels are required to have onboard a wearable USCG-approved personal flotation device (PFD) for each person. The PFDs must be of the appropriate size for the intended wearer, be in serviceable condition, and within easy access. The state of Florida urges all people onboard a boat to wear a life jacket. Vessels 16 feet in length or longer must also have at least one USCG-approved throwable Type IV PFD that is immediately available in case of a fall overboard. A child under the age of 6 must wear a USCG-approved Type I, II or III personal flotation device while onboard a vessel under 26 feet in length while the vessel is underway. “Underway” is defined as anytime except when the vessel is anchored, moored, made fast to the shore or aground. Vessels with built-in fuel tanks or enclosed compartments where gasoline fumes can accumulate are required to carry at least one fire extinguisher (depending upon vessel length) which is approved for marine use. All vessels are required to carry an efficient sound-producing device, such as a referee’s whistle. Vessels less than 16 feet in length are required to carry at least 3 visual distress signals approved for nighttime use when on coastal waters from sunset to sunrise. Vessels 16 feet or longer must carry at least 3 daytime and three nighttime visual distress signals (or 3 combination daytime/nighttime signals) at all times when on coastal waters. The use of sirens or flashing, occulting or revolving lights is prohibited except where expressly allowed by law. Recreational vessels are required to display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise and during periods of reduced visibility (fog, rain, haze, etc.). The U.S. Coast Guard Navigation Rules specify lighting requirements for every description of watercraft.

No person may operate a monohull boat of less than 20 feet in length while exceeding the maximum weight, persons, or horsepower capacity as displayed on the manufacturer’s capacity plate.

The facility is prohibited from renting a vessel that does not have proper safety equipment, exceeds the recommended horsepower or load capacity, or is not seaworthy. The facility must provide pre-rental or pre-ride instruction on the safe operation of the vessel with a motor of 10 horsepower or more. This instruction must include, at a minimum, operational characteristics of the vessel, safe operation and right-of-way, operator responsibilities and local waterway characteristics. The person delivering this information must have completed a NASBLA/state-approved boater safety course. All renters required by law to have a boater education ID card must have the card or its equivalent before the facility may rent to them. The livery must display boating safety information in a place visible to the renting public in accordance with FWC guidelines. PWC liveries must provide on-the-water demonstration and a check ride to evaluate the proficiency of renters. PWC liveries may not enter into rental agreement with anyone under the age of 18. PWC liveries must display safety information on the proper operation of a PWC. The information must include: propulsion, steering and stopping characteristics of jet pump vessels, the location and content of warning labels, how to re-board a PWC, the applicability of the Navigation Rules to PWC operation, problems with seeing and being seen by other boaters, reckless operation, and noise, nuisance and environmental concerns. Frequently Asked Questions

Vessels operating in Florida waters must comply with the U.S. Coast Guard requirements relating to marine sanitation devices, where applicable.

All vessels must be equipped with an effective muffling device. The use of cutouts is prohibited, except for vessels competing in a regatta or official boat race and such vessels while on trial runs.

Law enforcement officers of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, sheriffs’ deputies of the various counties, municipal police officers, and all other law enforcement officers, as defined in section 943.10, Florida Statutes, have the authority to order the removal or relocation of vessels deemed to be an interference with navigation or a hazard to public safety; to enforce all boating safety laws; and to conduct vessel inspections in accordance with state law. A law enforcement officer may stop any vessel to check for compliance with boating safety equipment and registration requirements and to conduct resource inspections in accordance with state law.

Manatees are protected by state and federal law. It is illegal to harass, hunt, capture or kill any marine mammal, including manatees. Anything that disrupts a manatee’s normal behavior is a violation of law, punishable under federal law up to a $50,000 fine, one-year imprisonment, or both. Boaters must observe all manatee protection zone requirements. Boaters who accidentally strike a manatee are urged to report the strike to the FWC and may not be subject to prosecution, provided they were operating in accordance with any applicable vessel speed restrictions at the time of the strike.

Seagrasses are the principal food for endangered marine herbivores such as manatees and green sea turtles, act as natural filters to help purify the water, and provide a suitable environment for a wide variety of marine life. Boaters should make all available attempts to avoid running through seagrass beds. Navigation charts identify seagrass beds as light green or marked as “grs” on the chart. Boaters should make all possible attempts to stay within channels when unfamiliar with a waterway. Avoid taking shortcuts through seagrass beds to avoid causing propeller scars. It is a violation of Florida law to damage seagrass beds in some areas within state waters.

On which type of vessel must all people on board wear a USCG approved PFD in Illinois?

Illinois law requires the following with respect to PFDs.

All vessels must have at least one USCG–approved wearable PFD for each person on board or being towed. All vessels 16 feet or longer, except canoes and kayaks, also must carry one USCG–approved throwable device. All children under the age of 13 must wear a USCG–approved PFD on vessels less than 26 feet in length when underway unless they are below decks in an enclosed cabin or on a vessel operating on private property. A PWC or a specialty prop-craft may not be operated unless each person on board is wearing a USCG–approved PFD. (Inflatable PFDs are not approved for PWC or prop-craft use.) All PFDs must be in good and serviceable condition and readily accessible. The PFDs must be of the proper size for the intended wearer. Sizing for PFDs is based on body weight and chest size.

According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device

Which of the following requirements must be considered when choosing a personal flotation device PFD )? Canada?

Types of Personal Flotation Devices – Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) also known as PFDs or lifejackets, save lives. It’s as simple as that. It’s why the U.S. Coast Guard requires that PFDs be carried onboard all vessels. They are the most important piece of safety equipment on your boat, and you should wear one whenever you’re boating. When you’re choosing a PFD, you need to make sure that:

It is the appropriate type for your boating location and activity; It is the right size and has enough buoyancy to support you in the water; and It is approved by the U.S. Coast Guard

PFD Type Best For Disadvantages Notes
Type I: Offshore Life Jacket All waters, especially open, rough, or remote waters where rescue can be delayed Large and awkward; difficult to swim in Adult size: 22 lb. of buoyancy. Child size: 11 lb. of buoyancy. Will turn unconscious wearers to face-up position.
Type II: Near-Shore Buoyant Vest Calm, inland waters where there is a good chance of rescue May not turn some unconscious wearers face-up Adult size: 15 1/2 lb. of buoyancy. Child size: 11 lb. of buoyancy. Infant size: 7 lb. of buoyancy. Will turn some unconscious wearers to face-up position.
Type III: Flotation Aid Calm, inland waters where there is a good chance of rescue Wearers must put themselves in face-up position Same buoyancy as Type II. examples: Float coat, fishing vest, water sport vest
Type IV: Device All waters where help is present Not designed to be worn; intended for use in waters with heavy boat traffic Designed to be thrown and grasped until rescued; never worn. examples: Cushions, ring buoys, horseshoe buoys
Type V: Special Use Device Specific activities; check approval condition on label Some Type Vs are designed for cooler climates and others are approved only when worn Some Type V devices provide hypothermia protection. examples: Deck suits, work vests, boardsailing vests

Which of the following personal floatation devices are approved for skiing participants or personal watercraft operators in Virginia?

Personal Watercraft Laws & Regulations – Do not underestimate PWCs – they are very powerful for their small size and demand the same respect as any boat. In fact, PWC operation must adhere to the same rules and regulations as any other powerboat – including registration with the state and a B-1 class fire extinguisher aboard. PWCs have some additional requirements:

Every person on board and anyone being towed behind a personal watercraft (PWC) must wear a Coast Guard approved Type I, II, III or V personal flotation device (PFD). Inflatable PFDs are not intended for use while participating in tow sports or other high impact sports, and do not meet the wear requirements for PWC operation. PWCs must come to “no wake” speed when within 50 feet or less of docks, piers, boathouses, boat ramps, or people in the water and vessels other than personal watercraft. This does not prohibit the pulling of a skier with a rope less than 50 feet.

During which situation must children under six years of age wear a USCG?

Florida law requires the following with respect to life jackets.

All vessels must carry one USCG–approved wearable life jacket for each person on board. In addition to the above requirement, vessels 16 feet in length or longer must have one USCG–approved throwable device on board and immediately available. Children under six years of age must wear a USCG–approved life jacket at all times while on any vessel less than 26 feet in length that is underway upon Florida waters. (“Underway” means any time except when the vessel is anchored, moored, docked, or aground.) Life jackets must be used in accordance with the USCG approval label. Each person on board a PWC, and anyone being towed behind a vessel, must wear a USCG–approved life jacket. Inflatable life jackets are not to be worn on PWC or while water-skiing. All life jackets must be in good and serviceable condition and legibly marked showing the USCG approval number. The life jackets must be of the proper size for the intended wearer. Sizing for life jackets is based on body weight and chest size.

According To New York Law, Who Must Wear A Uscg-Approved Personal Flotation Device

What is the USCG approved meaning of?

Approval Status: There are four approval status types: – APPROVED (App) – Product meets current requirements and is approved for production under Coast Guard approval. FORMER-MAY USE – Product is no longer approved for production but previously produced items may continue to be used as long as in good and serviceable condition. FORMER-MAY NOT USE – Product is no longer approved for production and previously produced items may not be used or remain in service. This status is used for products which are obsolete, or may present a safety hazard if they are used or remain in service. Examples are cork lifejackets, and dated items such as old pyrotechnics and survival rations. EXPIRED – Product’s approval has expired, and the approval holder has not notified us whether it should be extended or terminated. Pending resolution of its status, the product is no longer approved for production. Items manufactured prior to expiration of the approval are considered APPROVED.

Last Update: Monday, December 19, 2022

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Do life jackets have to be USCG approved?

There several types of traditional foam flotation devices as well as new inflatable life jackets. Each is designed for different boating activities and water conditions and each has its own maximum buoyancy, performance level, and limitations. You should choose your life jacket based on your boating activities and conditions.

  • Life jackets must be U.S.
  • Coast Guard-approved in order to meet carriage requirements.
  • There must be a properly fitting life jacket for each and every person aboard a recreational vessel.
  • Life jackets must be Coast Guard-approved, in serviceable condition and the appropriate size for the intended user.

Obviously, they are most effective when worn. On a vessel underway, children under 13 must wear an appropriate Coast Guard-approved PFD, unless they are below decks or in an enclosed cabin. Within the geographic boundaries of any State that has established a child PFD wear requirement, that State’s requirement will be adopted.

  1. Our Life Jacket Loaner Program for kids can help you get the right life jacket for the day or weekend.
  2. To find the loaner site nearest you, use our convenient map,
  3. Each state may have additional wear requirements, such as for water skiing, personal watercraft operation, white water boating activities and during certain cool-weather months.

Additionally, a boat 16′ in length or greater, except canoes and kayaks) must have a throwable flotation device. See specific state requirements for life jackets, If you haven’t already seen them, soon you will notice certain life jackets have a new style of label on the inside. Eventually, all new life jackets which are Coast Guard approved and available for purchase in the United States will have these new labels.

  • It is part of an effort to make selecting the right life jacket for you and your intended on-water activity, easier.
  • This new labeling process is also referred to as life jacket label harmonization, which is an effort to make them more universally understood and accepted, especially in Canada and Europe.

The goal was to simplify the labels, with less writing and more icons.

  1. Performance summary graphic
  2. Activity appropriateness icons
  3. Legal requirements specified
  4. Reduce language barriers
  5. More universal acceptance
  6. Harmony with other countries
  7. Approval status clearly noted
  8. Third party testing verification
  9. Manufacturer contact information
  10. Care and cleaning instructions

In general, the intent of the new labels is to help users select and care for the appropriate life jacket for the activity in which they are participating. The labels have fewer words more easily understood icons. In 2014, the U.S. Coast Guard removed the “Type” codes from the Code of Federal Regulations. New life jackets that are brought to the market will feature these new labels. However, it will take many years for the older style labels to be completely phased out and you are likely to see both styles in stores, on boats and in use for many years to come. Selecting a proper life jacket and wearing it is the best thing a boater can do to ensure a safe and enjoyable day on the water. A hang tag with important information will accompany each new life jacket. If shopping in a store, be sure you leaf through this hang tag or ask a store associate if you have any questions. New life jackets feature information in four main categories, usually in separate boxes. At the top of the label, usually toward the neck, is sizing information. The sizing usually specifies a user weight range and chest size range. Proper fit is one of the most important considerations when selecting a life jacket.

  • Performance, Buoyancy and Turning Information
  • Warnings, Intended Activity and Limitations of Use
  • Manufacturer, Certification and Approval Information
  • Care and Maintenance Instructions

Performance, Buoyancy and Turning Information – The first thing you’ll notice is a bold-faced number. It could be 50, 70, 100, 150, or 275. This a measurement of gravitational force, which in the case of a life jacket is essentially buoyancy. Simply put, the higher the number, the greater the floatation. Level 70 Label Decoding – The bold 70 means it’s a Level 70 life jacket which provides performance similar to the Type III life jackets previously available. Life jackets that are rated lower than 70 are not U.S. Coast Guard approved. This is a metric measurement in Newtons (70N is roughly 15 lbs.

of floatation). Newtons are used so that it’s consistent with European and Canadian standards. Also, on a Level 70 life jacket label, you’ll see a dock and an extended hand with some slightly wavy lines indicating fairly calm water. This means this life jacket is suitable for near shore use in relatively protected water where rescue is likely to be near at hand.

You’ll note that the higher the number on these icons, the farther away the dock and background is, and the bigger the waves are in the icon. The curved arrow indicates the turning ability of the life jacket. Turning ability is whether or not a life jacket is capable or designed to turn an unconscious person face up, unassisted. The next thing you’ll notice are warnings and exclusions. In this example, this life jacket is suitable for general boating. However, there are icons with activities and a slash through it. These symbols indicate this life jacket is not suitable for towed sports such as skiing and tubing, nor is it for personal watercraft operation or whitewater paddle sports. In the United States and on navigable waterways, a Coast Guard approved life jacket, properly fitted for the intended wearer must be aboard for each occupant. Therefore, knowing your life jacket is approved by the Coast Guard to meet carriage requirements is important. You’ll find this information, as well as testing approval numbers and manufacturer information in this section of the label. A life jacket should be viewed as an investment. You should care for it like you would anything else aboard that depends on proper function, with the exception this one could save your life! Your label and manual that came with your life jacket will have general cleaning and care instructions.

  • There must be at least one life jacket for each person aboard
  • Life jackets must be properly sized for each person aboard
  • Children under a certain age are required to wear their life jacket (typically under 13 – see state requirements)
  • Participants engaged in certain water sports are required to wear a life jacket (typically skiing and personal watercraft operation – see state requirements)
  • Life jackets must be approved by the U.S. Coast Guard in order to meet requirements
  • These life jackets must be readily accessible and not in an out-of-reach location or in original packaging
  • Any boat 16′ and longer (except canoes and kayaks) must carry a throwable PFD
  • Throwable devices must be immediately available for use such as in the cockpit or near the helm
  • An inflatable life jacket must be properly armed with an unused gas cylinder
  • Inflatable life jackets are authorized for use on recreational boats by a person at least 16 years of age

What is a requirement for the USCG approved inflatable PFD?

California Life Jacket laws & requirements – Under California boating laws all personal flotation devices must be readily accessible and one throwable flotation device must be immediately available, With the exception of kayaks and canoes, every vessel must carry one wearable U.S.

Are PFD approved for persons of any age?

Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs): – A Canadian approved PFD is designed to keep you afloat in the water. PFDs were designed for use in recreational boating and are generally smaller, less bulky and more comfortable than lifejackets. They have less flotation than lifejackets, and have limited turning capacity, but are available in a variety of styles and colours Inflatable PFDs : An inflatable is a type of personal flotation device that either automatically inflates when immersed in water, or is inflated by the wearer using either an oral or manual inflation device.