Citizen Who Took The Law Into His Or Her Own Hands?

If you’re a vigilante, you might take the law into your own hands by trying to catch or punish someone in your own way. If you wrestle jaywalkers down to the ground, you might be called a vigilante, Vigilante is a form of the word vigilant, which means “keeping a watchful or close eye on events and people.” Sometimes a vigilante will make news for catching a criminal, and sometimes vigilante groups form to target crimes in a bad neighborhood.

noun member of a vigilance committee

Is it okay to take the law into your own hands?

This can be a very dangerous occurrence. No one has the civil rights to take the law into their own hands in the United States of America. Period! Our Local, State and Federal Governments all need to intervene in this matter and shut this tribunal down pronto.

This is not an option and we do not self govern on any level. This is not a chaotic nation, YET! Let’s not make it one! reminded me of a common trope I’ve heard in opposition to people’s carrying guns for deadly self-defense, e.g., It is shocking that a school which experienced the terror of an active shooter incident barely a year ago would endorse the carrying of guns on campus.

How much worse would the carnage have been if more armed vigilantes had decided to take the law into their own hands ? The problem is that the argument either misstates the law, or is trying to hide a normative claim behind what seems like a descriptive claim.

“Take the law into their own hands,” I think, generally conveys the message “illegally do something that only the legal system and its governmental enforcers may do.” After all, a power is being characterized as properly in someone else’s hands — the hands of the courts or the police — and a person is being condemned for usurping that power: for taking something that is someone else’s.

But the law has long recognized people’s rights (within broad limits) to agree to binding arbitration of their disputes. When parties go to binding arbitration, they are thus complying with the law by exercising their legal rights. Likewise, the law has long recognized people’s rights to use deadly force when necessary to try to protect either himself or a third party against a reasonably perceived imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury.

  • When armed citizens try to stop mass shooters, they are thus complying with the law by exercising their legal rights.
  • In both instances, people are using only the rights that the law has said are already lawfully in their hands (or that, by hypothesis, the law would say are lawfully in their hands, if we’re talking about the right to possess deadly weapons in places where one couldn’t have possessed them before).

To be sure, some things that could rightfully be called “taking the law into their own hands,” such as a private citizen’s punishing someone who is no longer a danger, or seizing someone else’s property just because he thinks it’s a fair compensation for money that he thinks is owed to him.

  • But that’s so precisely because the law doesn’t put such punishment or dispute resolution in private people’s hands.
  • The law does allow private lethal self-defense, and private binding arbitration enforced through court orders.
  • Now if you think that the law properly shouldn’t allow binding arbitration, lethal self-defense or the possession or carrying of tools for lethal self-defense, you can certainly argue that.

But the “people shouldn’t take the law into their own hands” isn’t a sound way of putting that argument.

When you take things into your own hands?

To deal with a problem yourself because the people who should have dealt with it have failed to do so : When the police failed to catch her son’s murderer, she decided to take matters into her own hands.

What does to lay down the law mean?

Idiom. to tell people what they must do, without caring about their opinions : Some parents talk things through with their kids instead of simply laying down the law.

What does it mean to take the law into one’s hands?

To do something illegal and often violent in order to punish someone because you know the law will not punish that person : One day, after years of violent abuse from her husband, she took the law into her own hands.

Why do people take the law in their own hands?

Taking the Law into own Hands 2022-01-31T14:28:24+02:00 The Rule of Law and the Perils of taking the Law into One’s Own Hands A recent film clip shared on social media, shows five members of Affirmative Repositioning (AR) entering the business premises of Zhou Jiahua, a Chinese businessman based in Windhoek’s Northern Industrial area.

  • The five men fiercely confront Jiahua.
  • They accuse him of flouting a wide array of laws, such as not wearing a coronavirus face mask, not concluding contracts with his Namibian staff and not permitting them to go on sick leave, as well as sexually assaulting one employee.
  • One of the AR men warns Jiahua that Namibia is a country with laws which he should respect, saying that if Jiahua continues with his “tendencies” to break the law, they will “close” his shop.

This incident has brought up some pertinent questions about the current state of the rule of law in Namibia and the perils of taking the law into one’s own hands. What is the Rule of Law? The notion of “Rule of Law” has its origins in the treaty of that was negotiated in 1215 between King John of England and a group of influential barons.

By all accounts, King John was not a kind ruler. He would throw people in jail or starve them for the smallest of reasons, he took their wives and land, and he raised taxes as he pleased. Tired of the King’s antics, the barons put an ultimatum to him: either to bring in some sweeping reforms to his rule, or to face civil war.

The King reluctantly agreed to enact reforms and consequently the principles of the rule of law were established under the Magna Carta. Two provisions under the Magna Carta that have stood the test of time are clauses 39 and 40. These stipulate that “No free man shall be seized, imprisoned, dispossessed, outlawed, exiled or ruined in any way, nor in any way proceeded against, except by the lawful judgement of his peers and the law of the land” and “To no one will we sell, to no one will we deny or delay right or justice.” Most importantly, the Magna Carta established the idea that under the rule of law, ” no one is above the law “, not even the King.

Over the centuries the rule of law has developed into a universal and comprehensive list of rules that underpin the freedoms that societies living under constitutional democratic rule enjoy today. For example, the rule of law requires that all persons and organizations, including the government, are subject to and accountable to law.

It also requires that the law must be clear, known and enforced. Under the rule of law, courts are independent and resolve disputes in a fair and public manner where all persons are presumed innocent until proven otherwise by a court. In addition, under the rule of law, no person shall be arbitrarily arrested, imprisoned, or deprived of their property.

  1. When a court metes out punishment, it must be done in line with due process that is proportionate to the offence.
  2. Due process” requires that investigation of a person for an alleged wrongdoing must be carried out in accordance with the law and by persons duly authorized for this purpose.
  3. In terms of Article 1 of the Namibian Constitution, Namibia is founded on the principles of democracy, the rule of law and justice for all, where the power is vested in the people who exercise their sovereignty through the democratic institutions of the State.

In simple terms, this means that Namibia is indirectly ruled by its people through the representatives that they elect every five years. The people of Namibia give these representative State institutions the mandate to enforce the law without fear or favour.

In essence this relationship is similar to a contractual agreement where the State is held accountable to its people and consistency in the application of the law is assured. Moreover, the separation of State power into three branches – namely the (Parliament), the (the Courts) and the (the President and Cabinet) – ensures that the power of each of these branches is kept in check (see also ) What happens if we take the law into our own hands? People take the law into their own hands for various reasons.

For example, they may have lost trust in the institutions that are there to protect them, or it may be that the institutions that are supposed to protect the public are not doing their job. It may also happen that people think that the law is wrong or that adequate laws do not exist, and that they know what is actually right.

  • Unfortunately, history is replete with examples where mob justice and vigilante action have led to the death of innocent people, or where people have been denied an opportunity to seek justice for a wrong committed against them.
  • For instance, lynching is a racist form of vigilante action that used to be a common practice in some of the southern states in the USA until the 1950s.

Lynching typically involved actions by white supremacists, who would often kill someone by hanging, especially a black person, for an alleged offence without any legal trial. Quite often, the alleged offence would relate to allegations of sexual contact between black men and white women.

  • Another example reported a few years ago by The Nation, a Pakistani newspaper, involved a mob of about 400 people who attacked a Christian couple and set them on fire, alleging that they were involved in defiling a copy of the Holy Quran.
  • Closer to home, in July this year, supposed supporters of former South African President Jacob Zuma took the law into their own hands by looting and torching shopping centres across South Africa in protest against the jailing of the former President after he was handed a 15-month sentence for contempt of court.

This incident led to the death of several people. As diverse as these examples might be, there is one commonality among them – namely, that almost every time someone takes the law into their own hands, someone innocent dies or justice is denied. Differently put, taking the law into one’s own hands could lead to injustices, or even to an effective end to law as a source of social order.

This is because the person who purportedly metes out justice is most likely an interested party as opposed to an unbiased decision-maker. It is for this reason that our legal system provides that justice is best served by someone who is impartial, in the sense of having no direct interest in the outcome of the matter.

As mentioned earlier, the rule of law in Namibia is built on a constitutional democracy. This system allows us to actively participate in the improvement of our fundamental human rights. This can be done through using our rights to freedom of speech and by working with the government that we elected into power to change any rules that are unfair or unjust.

  1. If we are unhappy with the performance of our government representatives, it is our right to vote them out and put other persons into their places.
  2. At the same time, because Namibia is governed by the rule of law, taking the law into one’s own hands is often a crime in itself.
  3. Taking matters into our own hands puts at risk the entire system of the rule of law and due process with its important checks and balances.
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If vigilante action is allowed to become the norm, this could plunge Namibia into a situation of chaos where the strong will crush the weak, and only the most merciless people will rise to the top. This column was produced with support from Bread for the World and the Hanns Seidel Foundation.

What is it called when you take things personally?

How to Stop Taking Things Personally: 10 Ways That Work People take things personally for a variety of reasons. People take things personally because they are insecure or misinterpret what someone else is saying. It’s relatively easy to mistake what another person says, especially when there’s a communication breakdown.

  • When you a person takes things personally, they’re usually on the defense.
  • This means that they feel their character, abilities, competence, or personal achievements are under attack.
  • Of course, no one enjoy being spoken about in a negative light.
  • However, it’s important to remember that everyone has the right to voice their opinions, whether true or untrue.

What does this mean for the individual? While you can’t control what other people do or say, you can only control how you react to it. This is especially true for what you choose to internalize and that of which you choose to disregard. To internalize something means you are taking it personally.

What does it mean when someone takes things personally?

How to Deal With People Who Take Things Personally By Valentina Petrova Usually, people who take things personally refuse to admit it. They often project how they feel onto others, justify their emotional states, and make a mountain out of a molehill.

  1. They react to what they think is happening, not to what is happening.
  2. Meaning your perspective of the situation will be different from theirs.
  3. You may find yourself accused of saying or doing things that have never crossed your mind, guilt-tripped, and blamed for the way they feel.
  4. You may find yourself on the receiving end of condescending, sarcastic, and provocative remarks, passive-aggressive behavior, even violence.

Feeling confused, you may not know how to respond and what to do. You can ignore strangers who take things personally, walk away and never see them again. But what about people close to you? People you work with, live with, and possibly depend on? advertisement First, make sure you communicate clearly.

  1. Avoid “you” statements.
  2. Switch to “we” and neutral language, especially when discussing difficult subjects.
  3. Instead of saying “you have a problem,” try “what can we do together to improve/resolve, etc.” In the spirit of clarity, it’s better to explain yourself a little more than to economize.
  4. You can also preemptively address the person’s possible reactions.

“I know this may sound critical, and I am sorry. I value you and what you to contribute” Start your explanations with “from my perspective” or “the way I understand it” to avoid sounding accusatory. If it sounds like you have to think ahead of how to express your thoughts, requests, and desires to someone taking things personally, you are correct.

  1. Yes, it is a lot of work! But it is less work than having a full-blown argument or escalate a situation to the point of no return.
  2. Consider the challenge a growth opportunity.
  3. Take an effective communication class or read up on it and grow your communication skills.
  4. It will help you in other situations too.

Second, know yourself, your worth, and pay attention to your emotional reactions. You may be fine around regular people but find yourself defensive and confused by an experienced, manipulative, overly sensitive person. Remember, they’ve had a lifetime to practice taking things personally.

If you know who you are and your sensitivities, you can avoid confusion because you will know where your stuff ends and where their defensiveness begins. You will know if you truly caused the commotion or it was their over-reaction. If you made a mistake, apologize for it. If you didn’t, say you are sorry for how they feel, remind them of your intentions, and even repeat your request or rephrase your statement more clearly.

Keep yourself calm and levelheaded. Don’t add fuel to their fire. Do not apologize for anything you did not do. However, do seek to understand them and try to communicate your perspective. Sometimes it helps. Sometimes it doesn’t. Let it go. Agree to disagree or discuss later.

Third, ask yourself if you want to be right or if you want to be happy. Sometimes, you may have to be right. Another time, you may choose happiness. Decide based on the circumstances, what’s at stake, and the players involved. You choose your friends. You don’t have to keep the company of overly sensitive drama queens.

Keep your distance. Minimize interactions. When you do interact, take their reactions with a grain of salt. This is your practice not to take things personally. But wait! There is more. Read the rest of this article on my blog at Valentina Petrova has helped people with life, health, relationships, financial, career, professional, and business goals and challenges since 2015.

What is the word for being able to do things by yourself?

Autodidact – Definition, Meaning & Synonyms | Vocabulary.com.

What is it called when a law is taken down?

Repeal is the rescission of an existing law by subsequent legislation or constitutional amendment. Also referred to as abrogation. Repeal can be explicit or implicit.

What does bend the law mean?

Idiom. to change the rules in a way that is considered to be not important or not harmful : Can’t you bend the rules a little?

What is lying to the law called?

perjury n. the crime of intentionally lying after being duly sworn (to tell the truth) by a notary public, court clerk or other official. This false statement may be made in testimony in court, administrative hearings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, as well as by signing or acknowledging a written legal document (such as affidavit, declaration under penalty of perjury, deed, license application, tax return) known to contain false information. Although it is a crime, prosecutions for perjury are rare, because a defendant will argue he/she merely made a mistake or misunderstood.

What does Jesus mean by the law?

The law is the Ten Commandments as given by God to Moses which have been summed under two by Christ: Love God with your heart, soul, mind and strength and love your neighbor as yourself. Love God and do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

What is it called when you act as your own lawyer?

Appearing in court In Pro Per means that you are acting as your own attorney.

Why do citizens have to obey the law?

Everyone should obey the law. Obeying the law protects peace, public order, and good health. The First Amendment’s Religion Clauses were designed to protect such a legal system. They aimed to keep a diverse population at peace by giving them one shared system of law.

  • That system sensibly arose from the terrible Wars of Religion, which are the main historical background to religious freedom in the United States.
  • Religions always disagree, and frequently dispute their disagreements.
  • Therefore, the common law cannot be religion -based, and everyone must follow it.
  • Professor Ellis West made this point in his book, The Free Exercise of Religion in America: Its Original Constitutional Meaning, when he concluded “it is highly unlikely that early Americans believed that the free exercise of religion entails a right to religion-based exemptions from civil laws that the government has a right to pass” (p.305).

Occasionally the Supreme Court understands this point, as it did in Employment Division v. Smith, the sensible, yet controversial, case that ruled everyone must obey the law, without judicially-concocted religious exceptions. Smith is frequently criticized, and may be overruled soon.

Post- Smith, moreover, Congress and many state legislatures granted legislative exemptions to religions through their federal and state Religious Freedom Restoration Acts (RFRAs). It was the federal RFRA, not the Free Exercise Clause, that granted employers the right to refuse contraceptive insurance to their employees in Burwell v.

Hobby Lobby, Even though using contraceptives is a constitutional right, and even though the government was trying to pass universal health care coverage in the Affordable Care Act, i.e., health care coverage that would cover everyone, RFRA’s religious exemption gave many employers the right to disobey health law and set their own no-contraception standard.

President Donald Trump has expanded the exemption so that even more employers can deny their employees the insurance coverage. The employers no longer have a responsibility to report their denials to the government or the insurance company. Trump also threatened to cut off all federal health aid to California because it has a law that requires insurance companies to cover constitutionally-protected abortions.

Trump has also enlarged medical conscience against patients’ rights. Medical personnel already enjoyed extensive conscience clause protection, a legal right given to protect them from providing any service they do not want to provide. Trump’s new religious freedoms policies allow medical personnel to refuse patients for any reason of conscience.

The medical conscience trumps the health of women, LGBTQIs, people of color, minorities, the poor, or anyone the doctor’s or nurse’s conscience dislikes. The more appropriate, follow-the-law, standard would be to recognize that health law is supposed to protect patients’ health first, not consciences of medical providers.

LGBTQIs are a special object of discrimination. The dissenting justices in the gay marriage case, Obergefell v. Hodges, urged the protection of anti-gay conscience. Next term, the Supreme Court will hear a case, Fulton v. Philadelphia, in which Philadelphia refused to fund Catholic adoption agencies because they discriminated against same-sex couples in the placement of children.

  1. Philadelphia correctly wants the same antidiscrimination laws to apply to everyone.
  2. The religious freedom asked for in the case gives Catholics the possibility of winning a case in which Smith is overturned, and they earn a right to set the law their own way instead of obeying the law as it is.
  3. Vaccines are needed by everyone in order to preserve herd immunity and protect each other from disease.

States are learning what happens if they hand out religious or philosophical exemptions, letting people be vaccine-exempt for any personal reason. Outbreaks of measles in California, New York and other states have taught that everyone needs to be vaccinated.

  1. States have been changing their laws to require vaccination, realizing only everyone’s obedience to the health laws can protect everyone else.
  2. For many years, religious sex abusers hid their abuse under the argument that the First Amendment protected them from the law.
  3. That claim allowed them to hide their abusers’ records, and to protect the abusers instead of the abused.
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Gradually the courts learned in many abuse cases that religious people of any status need to be sued and to be required to obey the laws that protect children. Unfortunately, not all states allow these lawsuits to proceed. There is still the wrong idea that unlawful religions are protected from court scrutiny by the First Amendment.

Due to numerous court decisions from both state and federal courts, the First Amendment now leaves religious organizations free to discriminate against anyone they call a minister. According to the Court, the right to discriminate on the basis of age, disabilities, gender, sexual orientation, race and all the other antidiscrimination laws belongs to religions.

This rule is called the ministerial exception, which is an affirmative defense. It generally protects employers instead of employees because the case never gets to trial if the affirmative defense is met. The Ninth Circuit recently ruled, correctly, that a Catholic laywoman and a non-Catholic woman were teachers, not ministers, and so able to sue their employers for disabilities and age discrimination.

  • The Supreme Court was originally scheduled to hear oral argument in the two cases, St.
  • James School v.
  • Biel and Our Lady of Guadalupe School v.
  • Morrissey-Berru, on April 1, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, has postponed argument.
  • We wait to see if the Court will affirm the Ninth Circuit, or will instead expand the ability of employers to turn their religious employees into ministers who can never sue for wrongdoing.

It is hard to imagine a peaceful United States that allows religions a constitutional or statutory right to discriminate against all types of people. A system that, at the same time, allows them tax benefits. Church status with the IRS gives churches tremendous advantages, allowing churches to keep private much information about them.

A whistleblower recently complained that the privacy of the tax laws allowed the Latter-day Saints to make $100 billion in a supposedly tax-exempt investment fund requiring the funds to be distributed. Bob Jones should have set that issue straight. In 1983, the Supreme Court, 8-1, upheld the IRS’s decision to revoke Bob Jones University’s tax-exempt status because the school discriminated on the basis of race.

Justice Samuel Alito asked in the oral argument at Obergefell if Bob Jones would apply to cases involving sexual orientation discrimination: Well, in the Bob Jones case, the Court held that a college was not entitled to tax­exempt status if it opposed interracial marriage or interracial dating.

  • So would the same apply to a university or a college if it opposed same-sex marriage? The answer to that question should be yes, but the IRS has not yet moved to make it so.
  • The non-exempt rule should be applied to all organizations that violate antidiscrimination laws.
  • They should not have a constitutional right to break the laws and be tax exempt while they do it.

Imagine what that a law-obeying country would look like. Everyone would obey the laws banning racial discrimination, All employers would provide contraceptive insurance, All employers and stores would respect LGBTQI rights, No law would protect child abuse or abusers,

What is the hand of the law?

SC Accomplice Liability: What is the “Hand of One, Hand of All”? – “The hand of one is the hand of all” is basically legal slang for accomplice liability, It’s a phrase that is often misinterpreted by police officers and even attorneys sometimes. Although a police officer might think that “if one goes, all go,” and “the hand of one is the hand of all” means that you can be arrested because your friend had drugs in their pocket, they are wrong,

  • What “the hand of one is the hand of all” really means,
  • Examples of accomplice liability, and
  • SC cases that define accomplice liability.

You can be convicted of a crime even though you were not the “principal” who committed the crime if the State can prove that you:

  • Knew a crime was being committed,
  • Participated in the commission of the crime, and
  • Were present when the crime was committed.

Under an accomplice liability theory, you can be convicted of crimes that you did not intend to commit if an accomplice commits a crime that was a “natural and probable consequence” of the crime that you did intend to commit.

How do you talk to someone who takes everything personally?

How to deal with people who take things personally. If you have not seen It’s Not About You, read it Keep an eye out for Part 3 of this series – What to do If You Are Someone Who Takes Things Personally. Usually, people who take things personally refuse to admit it.

  • They often project how they feel onto others, justify their emotional states, and make a mountain out of a molehill.
  • They react to what they think is happening, not to what is happening.
  • Meaning your perspective of the situation will be different from theirs.
  • You may find yourself accused of saying or doing things that have never crossed your mind, guilt-tripped, and blamed for the way they feel.

You may find yourself on the receiving end of condescending, sarcastic, and provocative remarks, passive-aggressive behavior, even violence. Feeling confused, you may not know how to respond and what to do. You can ignore strangers who take things personally, walk away and never see them again.

But what about people close to you? People you work with, live with, and possibly depend on? If you like to know what to do and how to handle people who take things personally, read on. First, make sure you communicate clearly with someone you know to take things personally. Avoid “you” statements. Switch to “we” and neutral language, especially when discussing difficult subjects.

Instead of saying “you have a problem,” try “what can we do together to improve/resolve, etc.” In the spirit of clarity, it’s better to explain yourself a little more than to economize. You can also preemptively address the person’s possible reactions.

  1. I know this may sound critical, and I am sorry.
  2. I value you and what you contribute.” Start your explanations with “from my perspective” or “the way I understand it” to avoid sounding accusatory.
  3. If it sounds like you have to think ahead of how to express your thoughts, requests, and desires to someone taking things personally, you are correct.

Yes, it is a lot of work! But it is less work than having a full-blown argument or escalate a situation to the point of no return. If this is a person you work or live with, you must remember the big picture. You can’t just piss them off and blow them off.

  • You will need to interact with them in the future, and the least amount of friction between you, the better.
  • Consider the challenge a growth opportunity.
  • Take an effective communication class or read up on it and grow your communication skills.
  • It will help you in other situations too.
  • Second, know yourself, your worth, and pay attention to your emotional reactions.

You may be fine around regular people but find yourself defensive and confused by an experienced, manipulative, overly sensitive person. Remember, they’ve had a lifetime to practice taking things personally. If you know who you are and your sensitivities, you can avoid confusion because you will know where your stuff ends and where their defensiveness begins.

You will know if you truly caused the commotion or it was their over-reaction. If you made a mistake, apologize for it. If you didn’t, say you are sorry for how they feel, remind them of your intentions, and even repeat your request or rephrase your statement more clearly. Keep yourself calm and levelheaded.

Don’t add fuel to their fire. Do not apologize for anything you did not do. However, do seek to understand them and try to communicate your perspective. Sometimes it helps. Sometimes it doesn’t. Let it go. Agree to disagree or discuss later. Third, ask yourself if you want to be right or if you want to be happy.

  • Sometimes, you may have to be right.
  • Another time, you may choose happiness.
  • Decide based on the circumstances, what’s at stake, and the players involved.
  • You choose your friends.
  • You don’t have to keep the company of overly sensitive drama queens.
  • Eep your distance.
  • Minimize interactions.
  • When you do interact, take their reactions with a grain of salt.

This is your practice not to take things personally. A special variety of “taking things personally” is someone who, instead of becoming defensive, becomes condescending and sarcastic. They get triggered and seek to trigger you, consciously or not. They don’t defend themselves; they try to put you down instead, sometimes quietly, sometimes obnoxiously.

  • It will surprise you and destabilize you if you don’t understand what is happening.
  • If the person you are talking to is a know-it-all, they are likely to deploy this strategy more than any other.
  • Offense is their best defense.
  • Putting you down keeps them feeling superior when they feel inferior.
  • If you don’t know your worth, your triggers, and your vulnerabilities, you will fall for this every time.

You will feel awful, wrong, stupid, and misunderstood. You handle these situations with cool logic. Answer not to the putdowns and the sarcasm. Pretend you didn’t even hear it. Stick to your story and line of reasoning, to your request, to whatever you are trying to get across.

  1. Ask your questions objectively and neutrally.
  2. Ask for specifics.
  3. If you don’t have to have the conversation at hand, just leave.
  4. Say, “let’s talk about this later when both of us have had more time to think about it,” then turn around and just leave.
  5. If the other person is at a place where they feel the need to put you down, you cannot expect them to collaborate, cooperate, and cocreate.

Move on. Come back to the topic later if needed or forget about it. If this is someone close to you, consider talking to them about their reactions at a different time and see if they are interested in improving and learning how to communicate better. You may have to be patient with them.

If this is someone random in your life, avoid them as much as possible, or at least avoid topics that trigger them if they are not necessary to discuss. Forth, remember that those who take things personally suffer more than you know. They see the world through a warped victim lens. Have some compassion.

You can’t imagine what it is like to walk around feeling the need to defend yourself all of the time. Be friendly, but mind your boundaries. Be grateful that you don’t carry the heavy burden of insecurities. Remember that you have your quarks too. Polish your communication skills.

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Why do some people take everything so personal?

Why Do Some People Take Things So Personally? Question I have noticed that people who feel that so many others “mistreat” them often perceive things as being directed towards them when they are not. If they’re not invited to a gathering, it’s because they weren’t wanted there, not because the gathering was limited in size.

If someone forgets to call them, it’s because the other person doesn’t care, not because that person has a lot on their plate and just forgot. If someone is distant, it’s because that person is angry with them, not because that person has a lot on their mind. Why do so many people assume that other people’s actions/words revolve around them? These same people often engage is and blaming behavior.

Oh, and they never accidently “mistreat” anyone else. My response Dear Anonymous, The answer to the question you raise, “Why do so many people assume that other people’s actions/words revolve around them?” is complex. First, all human beings, not just some, construct reality from their own subjective perspectives.

Indeed, we cannot but perceive and understand things through our own systems of values and beliefs. This can lead us to conclude that our own personal beliefs and values are objective truths that apply not only to ourselves but to others and to the external world. Thus, if we want or desire something, we may come to think that it is desirable, and that others should also want or desire it; and if we think that something is important, then we may assume it must really be important.

While we all wrestle to some extent with this egocentric predicament, some people find it especially hard to emotionally appreciate that the world does not revolve entirely around them and that, like themselves, other people also have their own subjective perspectives through which they perceive reality.

  • Second, as I have discussed elsewhere (in my book, The New Rational ), many of us are metaphysically insecure,
  • This is fundamental insecurity about reality itself.
  • Typically, metaphysically insecure people demand perfection and thereby do not allow themselves to accept the inescapable imperfections of existence.

Thus, they tend to become preoccupied with and experience about the possibility of negative things happening. Now, metaphysically insecure people who are also highly ego-centered will tend to construct hypotheses (explanations) about reality based on their anxieties.

Thus, if a friend acts troubled or preoccupied, such a person will tend to take it personally and think the behavior is aimed at him, even if there is no particular reason to draw such a conclusion. According to Logic-Based Therapy (LBT), we can cultivate moral virtues, which allow us to overcome such irrational tendencies.

According to LBT, there are a number of common human irrational tendencies, each of which has its respective virtue that trumps it. The virtue for demanding perfection is metaphysical security or acceptance of the imperfections in reality, including that of human beings.

  • The respective virtue for ego-centric “world-revolves-around-me” thinking is understanding or the ability to connect with others.
  • In my book, The New Rational Therapy, I discuss philosophical “antidotes” that can be applied toward attaining these virtues.
  • For example, one antidote toward becoming more empathetic would be to try to see what interests we have in common with others rather than concentrating on what makes us different.

Thus, we all feel pain, suffer disappointment, get tired and grumpy, sick, hungry, and so on. By realizing such commonalities we can more readily learn to construct alternative non-egocentric hypotheses, which explain, for example, why someone might not have been his or her usual friendly self on a given occasion.

So the answer to your question is that a significant number of people are insecure about reality and tend to read these insecurities into the actions/words of others and take them personally. Such individuals could therefore benefit from building up their metaphysical security and becoming more empathetic.

If you want more details, please read my book, The New Rational Therapy, Best wishes, Elliot D. Cohen, Ph.D. Get the help you need from a therapist near you–a FREE service from Psychology Today. Citizen Who Took The Law Into His Or Her Own Hands : Why Do Some People Take Things So Personally?

What do you call people who take things too seriously?

The word ‘ blackletter ‘ is traditionally the word most associated with someone or something that takes an overly serious (therefore rigid) adherence to rules. There are other words that articulate the same idea. He takes a blackletter view of the rules. When it comes to rules, he’s rather hidebound.

Is it ever appropriate to break the law?

Is it acceptable to break the law under certain circumstances? Law is defined as; the system of rules that a particular country or community recognizes as regulating the actions of its members and may enforce by the imposition of penalties. It should be acceptable to bend the law if it is used for good intentions.

Laws are meant to keep people safe, but under certain conditions they are over controlling, and they need to be broken. It can be beneficial or even life saving at times to break the law, but it is not acceptable to break the law at all times. There are exceptions to the law, and they need to be recognized when the time is right.

Imagine if a government started to kill its own people in an uncontrollable and psychotic manner. This would be a time where the people would have to rebel, or fight back, against the governing body in control. The law would be broken because attacks to this scale would be illegal, but it is all in an effort to save harmless civilians being murdered by an irrational higher power.

  • If the innocent people do not break the law and fight back, then more innocent people die and it creates a more unsafe environment.
  • The law needs to be show more content These people believe that the law is too threatening to find any loophole for the greater safety of people.
  • However, these people do not see that there are justifications to the law in some cases that are positive and are for the good/safety of people.

For example, driving over the speed limit, or recklessly, to rush someone in critical condition to the hospital would be a time when justifying the law would be acceptable with the intention of saving a life. The driving illegally for someone’s safety would also be acceptable if a woman is in labor and needs to get to the hospital as quickly as possible before she gives birth.

What is forbidden in law?

1. not permitted by order or law.

What is the hand of the law?

SC Accomplice Liability: What is the “Hand of One, Hand of All”? – “The hand of one is the hand of all” is basically legal slang for accomplice liability, It’s a phrase that is often misinterpreted by police officers and even attorneys sometimes. Although a police officer might think that “if one goes, all go,” and “the hand of one is the hand of all” means that you can be arrested because your friend had drugs in their pocket, they are wrong,

  • What “the hand of one is the hand of all” really means,
  • Examples of accomplice liability, and
  • SC cases that define accomplice liability.

You can be convicted of a crime even though you were not the “principal” who committed the crime if the State can prove that you:

  • Knew a crime was being committed,
  • Participated in the commission of the crime, and
  • Were present when the crime was committed.

Under an accomplice liability theory, you can be convicted of crimes that you did not intend to commit if an accomplice commits a crime that was a “natural and probable consequence” of the crime that you did intend to commit.

What does hand mean in law?

Hand Also found in:,,,,,,,, Related to Hand:,, HAND. That part of the human body at the end of the arm.2. Formerly the hand was considered as the symbol of good faith, and some contracts derive their names from the fact that the hand was used in making them; as handsale, (q.v.) mandatum, (q.v.) which comes from a mandata.

  1. The hand is still used for various legal or forensic purposes.
  2. When a person is accused of a crime and he is arraigned, and he is asked to hold up his right hand; and when one is sworn as a witness, he is required to lay his right hand on the Bible, or to hold it up.3.
  3. Hand is also the name of a measure of length used in ascertaining the height of horses.

It is four inches long. See Measure: Ell.4. In a figurative sense, by hand is understood a particular form of writing; as if B writes a good hand. Various kinds of hand have been used, as, the secretary hand, the Roman hand, the court hand, &c. Wills and contracts may be written in any of these, or any other which is intelligible.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856. Want to thank TFD for its existence?, add a link to this page, or visit, Link to this page: Not one of them claimed the pot, and not one of them called the size of his hand, Simultaneously and in silence they faced their cards on the table, while a general tiptoeing and craning of necks took place among the onlookers.

Pendleton says it takes a woman’s hand and heart to make a home, does he?” he asked evasively. His free hand went to my throat, and in that moment I knew the bitterest foretaste of death earned by one’s own idiocy. Her entrapped hand was on the table, but she had already put her other hand behind her waist.

By the dead hands at my throat but he shall die, Bar Comas. With her hands hanging exhausted on the quilt, looking extraordinarily lovely and serene, she looked at him in silence and tried to smile, and could not. ‘If I were to try my hand,’ says Edwin, with a boyish boastfulness getting up in him, ‘on a portrait of Miss Landless-in earnest, mind you; in earnest-you should see what I could do!’ Raoul did so; but, as he did not lift his hand in front of his eyes, ready to fire, the Persian told him to resume that attitude and to continue it, whatever happened.

I have had a pattern in my hand,” He glanced at the shoe with some little passing touch of pride. Its radiant face looked down smiling on me; it beckoned with its little hand, and floated on again, leading me as the Star led the Eastern sages in the olden time.

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