Under Wisconsin Law, What Is Required For Persons 12 To 15 Years Old To Operate A Pwc Legally?

Under Wisconsin Law, What Is Required For Persons 12 To 15 Years Old To Operate A Pwc Legally
It is illegal for a parent or guardian to allow a child to operate a vessel in violation of the requirements below.

A person under the age of 12 may not operate a PWC. A person 12-15 years old may operate a PWC only if he or she has completed a boating safety course that is accepted by the Wisconsin DNR. (Parental supervision is not a substitute for a boating safety course certificate as with other motorboats.) A person at least 16 years old may operate a PWC only if he or she has completed a boating safety course that is accepted by the Wisconsin DNR. A person born before January 1, 1989, is exempt from the safety course requirement. A person under 16 years old may not rent or lease a PWC.

Which of the following is legal operation of a PWC under Wisconsin law?

These are additional laws for operating a PWC in Wisconsin.

A PWC may not be operated between sunset and sunrise. A PWC operator must always face forward. A PWC must be operated in a responsible manner. Maneuvers that endanger people or property are prohibited, including:

Jumping a wake with a PWC within 100 feet of another vessel Operating within 100 feet of a vessel that is towing a person on water skis, inner tube, wakeboard, or similar device, or operating within 100 feet of the tow rope or person being towed Weaving your PWC through congested waterway traffic Steering toward another object or person in the water and swerving at the last possible moment in order to avoid collision Chasing, harassing, or disturbing wildlife with your PWC

There are minimum age and boater education requirements for operators of personal watercraft as discussed in the “Who May Operate a PWC” section of this course.

What must a person 14 or 15 years of age have in order to legally operate a motorboat or PWC on Colorado waters?

Age and Operator Restrictions – To operate a vessel on Colorado’s public waters, a person:

Under 14 years of age may not operate any motorboat or personal watercraft on Colorado’s public waters. 14 or 15 years of age may operate a motorboat or personal watercraft on Colorado’s public waters only if he or she has passed an approved boating safety course and has a Boating Safety Certificate issued by the boating safety course provider.

A person 16 years of age or older may operate a motorboat or personal watercraft on Colorado’s public waters.

Can a 12 year old operate a boat in Wisconsin?

Boater safety requirements Wisconsin boating safety certification or out of state equivalent certification is required for operators born on or after January 1, 1989. Safety certification is required to operate at age 16. Read the boating regulations for full details on age and operating restrictions.

What must persons 12 to 17 years of age have to legally operate a motorized vessel over 10 horsepower including a PWC unaccompanied?

Iowa –

  • Anyone may operate a motorboat with a maximum of 10 horsepower on his or her own.
  • A person under the age of 12 wishing to operate a vessel with more than 10 horsepower must be accompanied on board by a supervisor who is at least 18 years old and who has experience operating the vessel.
  • Anyone aged 12 to 17 (inclusive) may operate a motorboat or personal watercraft of 10 horsepower or more if accompanied on board by a person who is at least 18 years old and who has experience operating the vessel or if he or she has successfully completed a boater education course that is approved by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
  • Anyone required to have completed a boater education course must carry their boater education certificate on board and keep it readily available for inspection by a law enforcement officer whenever the vessel is in operation.

Which of the following is a recommended practice for PWC operation quizlet?

Which of the following is a recommended practice for PWC operation? Using courtesy and common sense at all times.

When operating a PWC what is required for steering?

PWC are propelled by a jet drive where water is drawn into a pump and then forced out under pressure through a steering nozzle at the back of the unit. This “jet” of pressurized water is directed by the steering control—when the steering control is turned, the steering nozzle turns in the same direction. For example, if the steering control is turned right, the nozzle turns right and the jet of water pushes the back of the vessel to the left, which causes the PWC to turn right. The most important thing to remember about steering most PWC (and other jet-drive vessels) is that you always must have power in order to maintain control. If you allow the engine on a PWC or other jet-propelled vessel to return to idle or shut off during operation, you may lose all steering control. Many PWC will continue in the direction they were headed before the throttle was released or the engine was shut off, no matter which way the steering control is turned. Always allow plenty of room for stopping. You may not stop immediately even after releasing the throttle or shutting off the engine. Even PWC that have a braking system do not stop immediately. Never use reverse (if equipped) to stop a PWC because you or your passengers could be thrown from it.

Unit 3 of 6 Topic 6 of 9 Page 3 of 16

When may a person 12 years of age or older legally operate a vessel powered by an engine that is 15 horsepower or more?

Persons 12 to 15 years of age may operate a vessel powered by a motor of 15 hp or more, including PWCs, if they are supervised on board by a person at least 18 years of age and in possession of his/her California Boater Card. There is no age restriction for operating a sailboat under 30 ft.

Under which conditions may a person under 14 years of age operate a vessel legally quizlet?

Under which conditions may a person under 14 years of age operate a vessel legally? The operator is under the direct, onboard supervision of a person 16 years of age or older.

Under which conditions may a person under 14 years of age operate a vessel legally Missouri?

Missouri Boating Laws and Regulations All persons must be at least 14 years of age to legally operate a motorboat or PWC unless under the direct, onboard supervision of a parent, guardian, or other person 16 years of age or older.

How old do you have to be to drive a PWC in Wisconsin?

Age and Operator Restrictions – A person who was born on or after January 1, 1989, and who is 12 years of age or older may operate a motorboat only if he or she:

Has completed a boating safety course that is accepted by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources or Is accompanied by a parent, legal guardian, or designated person in the motorboat who is at least 18 years of age and that person holds a valid boating safety certificate or was born before January 1, 1989.

A person who is at least 12 years old may operate a PWC only if he or she has completed a boating safety course accepted by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Note: While persons born before January 1, 1989, are exempt from the education requirement, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources strongly advises all participants to take a boating safety course.

What size boat motor can a 12 year old drive?

According to the Vessel Operation Restriction Regulations (VORRs), these age and horsepower restrictions apply to any person who operates a pleasure craft for recreational purposes in Canadian waters.

Persons under 16 years of age are prohibited from operating a pleasure craft that is above these specified horsepower limits.

Persons under 12 years of age who are not directly supervised by a person 16 years of age or older may only operate a pleasure craft propelled by a motor of no more than 10 hp (7.5 kW), Persons at least 12 years of age but under 16 years of age who are not directly supervised by a person 16 years of age or older may only operate a pleasure craft propelled by a motor of no more than 40 hp (30 kW),

Only persons 16 years of age or older may operate a personal watercraft (PWC) without supervision. The above restrictions do not apply in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

What is required for children under 13 years of age while underway on a vessel unless they are below deck or in an enclosed cabin?

33 CFR 175.15(c) provides that no person may operate a recreational vessel underway with any child under 13 years old aboard unless each such child is either wearing an appropriate PFD approved by the Coast Guard or below decks or in an enclosed cabin.

What is required of children under 13 years of age while underway on a vessel less than 26 feet long?

Use this quick table for boating under the influence (BUI) limits, penalties, and life jacket age requirements from each state and territory in the United States. The US Coast Guard requires properly fitting life jackets be readily accessible and within reach of all passengers on board, along with a throwable floatation devi c e,

  • The table below includes s ome requirements f or life jacket s on human – powered vessels such as kayaks, stand-up paddleboard or other similar craft however for specific details, please check with your state for more details,
  • For children, the US Coast Guard requires that when a vessel is underway, children under 13 years of age must wear their life jacket.

Exceptions are for when the children are below deck or within an enclosed cabin. To learn how to choose the correct children’s life jacket that fits properly, click this link, Information on this table includes a link back to its source for each state an d boaters should check with the states where they intend to boat before heading out on the water to ensure that there have been no changes.

STATE OR TERRITORY BLOOD ALCOHOL LIMIT % BUI PENALTY LIFE JACKET AGE REQUIREMENT
Federal n/a n/a Federal Law requires that when a vessel is underway, children under 13 years of age must wear their life jacket. Exceptions for when below deck or within an enclosed cabin. State laws may vary.
Alabama ,08 Large fines and/or jail time plus suspension of operator’s certification. All persons under eight (8) years of age, on any vessel, must, at all times, wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation device that must be strapped, snapped, or zipped securely in place; except, that no personal flotation device should be required when inside an enclosed cabin or enclosed sleeping space.
Alaska ,08 Driving under the influence and the penalties for conviction also apply to boat operators. Persons under 13 must wear a life jacket when in an open boat, on the deck of a boat, or when being towed (i.e. tubing, waterskiing)
Arizona ,08 Th estate of Arizona’s operating under the influence (OUI) law mirrors the states vehicular driving under the influence DUI laws and penalties. All Vessels, including paddleboards and kayaks, must have at least one USCG-approved wearable life jacket for each person on board. The only exceptions are sailboards and certain racing shells. All children 12 years of aga and younger must wear a USCG-approved wearable life jacket while underway on the any vessel. the life jacket must be fastened according to the manufacturer’s recommended use and must fit the child properly.
Arkansas ,08 Upon a first conviction, a person will lose his or her driver’s license for a period of 6 months. In addition, jail and fine may be included. Children under 12 years old and younger must wear a USCG-approved PFD securely fastened to their person at all times while on any vessel. Except if the child is within the enclosed area of a houseboat or cruiser, or within the area enclosed by railing on a party barge, cruiser, or houseboat, and the vessel is not underway.
California ,08 or less Operating a vessel while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs is a misdemeanor and could carry a penalty of one year in the county jail, or a fine, or both. No person may operate or give permission to operate a vessel sixteen feet or more in length unless at least one wearable personal flotation device is on board for each person, plus at least one throwable personal flotation device, which is immediately available. Under state law, it is an infraction, punishable by a fine of up to $250, to operate a vessel of any length unless every child under 13 years of age on board is wearing a Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
Colorado ,08 It is a misdemeanor for any person to operate or be in actual physical control of a vessel in this state while Under the influence of alcohol; any controlled substance; any combination of alcohol and any controlled substance. requires all operators and passengers to wear U.S. Coast Guard approved life jackets and requires operators to use a lanyard switch. children 12 years of age and younger are required to wear a PFD whenever their vessel is on the water, except when they are in an enclosed cabin or below deck.
Connecticut ,08 The penalty for a first violation may be: a fine; suspension of boating privileges, jail, probation, and or hours community service Be worn by children under 13 years old on any vessel that is underway unless the child is below deck or in an enclosed cabin. Be worn by anyone in a manually propelled vessel from October 1 through May 31.
Delaware ,08 Fines, imprisoned, or both. Every operator of a recreational boat shall be responsible for providing for the protection of any child 12 years of age or under by having any such child who is aboard a recreational boat upon the waters of this State, properly wear a Type I, II, III or V Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device which is in good serviceable condition and of the proper size. This section shall not apply to any child who is below deck or in an enclosed cabin or while said recreational boat is anchored or moored.
Florida ,08 A person is guilty of the offense of boating under the influence is subject to fines, imprisonment, or both. A person may not operate a vessel less than 26 feet in length on the waters of this state unless every person under 6 years of age on board the vessel is wearing a personal flotation device currently approved by the United States Coast Guard and used in accordance with the United States Coast Guard approval label while such vessel is underway. For the purpose of this section, “underway” means at all times except when a vessel is anchored, moored, made fast to the shore, or aground.
Georgia ,08 Those arrested for boating under the influence may lose their privilege to operate a boat or PWC until they successfully complete a DUI Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Program; and will also be charged with a misdemeanor punishable by fines and/or prison time. All vessels must have a least one US Coast Guard USCG-approved Type I, II, III, or V person flotation device (PFD), sometimes called life jacket, for each person on board. Type V PFDs are acceptable only when worn and securely fastened. Children under 13 years old are required to wear a USCG-approved PFD while on board any moving vessel. Except if the child is in a fully enclosed cabin.
Hawaii ,08 Violations may be subject to fines and fees. Children 12 years of age and under must wear a personal flotation device (PFD) while aboard a vessel operating or anchored offshore.
Idaho ,08 BUI is a misdemeanor and can include time in jail and/or a fine; and to attend and successfully complete a course on safe boating. Children 14 and under must wear an approved life jacket when they are aboard a boat 19 feet in length or less whenever the boat is underway or under power. This applies to manually propelled boats such as canoes and rafts in addition to powerboats, sailboats, personal watercraft (jet skis) and fishing float tubes.
Illinois ,08 operating under the influence (OUI) is a Class “A” misdemeanor and can included jail and fines. All vessels must have at least one U.S. Coast Guard (USCG)–approved wearable personal flotation device (PFD), sometimes called life jacket, for each person on board or being towed. All vessels 16 feet or longer, except canoes and kayaks, also must carry one USCG–approved throwable PFD. All children under the age of 13 must wear a PFD on vessels less than 26 feet in length when underway, unless they are below decks in an enclosed cabin or on a vessel operating on private property.
Indiana ,08 A first offense may lose all their driving privileges (motorized boat and motor vehicle), penalties and fines. Children under 13 years of age are required to wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket when underway on any boat.
Iowa ,08 Boating under the influence violations will be subject to fines, Imprisonment, and a loss of operating privileges. A person shall not operate a vessel in Iowa unless every person on board the vessel who is age 12 and under is wearing a U.S. Coast Guard approved life jacket. A life jacket must be worn when the vessel is underway, which means when a vessel is not at anchor, tied to a dock or the bank/shore or aground. A child age 12 and under in an enclosed cabin, below deck, or aboard a commercial vessel with a capacity of 25 persons or more is exempt.
Kansas ,08 Violations can include imprisonment, a fine or both. Anyone12 years old and youngermust wear a life jacket at all times when on board a boat or being towed behind the boat on skis or a tube.
Kentucky ,08 Under the influence of any substance that impairs the operator’s driving ability may be subject to fines and possible jail time. Persons under 12 years of age must wear a PFD while in the open part of a boat that is under way.
Louisiana ,08 Penalties include suspension or revocation of boating privileges and driver’s license. Children 16 years of age and younger are required to wear a USCG-approved PFD while underway on a vessel less than 26 feet long.
Maine ,08 Penalties include fine, imprisonment, or both. Children 10 years of age and younger are required to wear a USCG-approved PFD at all times while on board a watercraft unless the watercraft is docked, anchored, or moored.
Maryland ,08 Violators subject to misdemeanor, fine, imprisonment, or both. All children under the age of 13 must WEAR a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket (Type I, II, III or V) while underway on a recreational vessel under 21 feet in length on Maryland waters.
Massachusetts ,08 Penalties include the loss of a motor vehicle driver’s license. Life preservers are required to be worn by: (1) youth less than 12 years of age (2) personal watercraft users (3) waterskiers (4) canoeists/kayakers from September 15 – May 15.
Michigan ,08 Boating under the influence violators are guilty of a misdemeanor, and or a felony. All children under 6 years of age to wear a USCG–approved Type I or II PFD when riding on the open deck of any vessel while underway.
Minnesota ,08 Violator subject to fines, fees, jail time, loss of boating privileges, and felony charges. Children under 10 years old are required to wear a properly fitted life jacket while a boat in underway.
Mississippi ,08 Fines, or imprisonment, and violator must complete a boating safety course. Anyone 12 years and younger must wear a Coast Guard approved Personal Flotation Device at all times while the vessel is underway.
Missouri ,08 A person commits the offense of boating while intoxicated if he or she operates a vessel while in an intoxicated condition. The offense of boating while intoxicated is a class B misdemeanor. Each person under the age of seven who is on board any watercraft shall wear a personal flotation device which is approved by the United States Coast Guard. This law does not apply when the person under the age of seven is in a part of a watercraft which is fully enclosed, where such enclosure will prevent such person from falling out of or being thrown from the watercraft.
Montana ,08 and less Subject to a fine or jail or both. Children under 12 years of age must wear a life jacket on a boat less than 26 feet in length that is in motion.
Nebraska ,08 Subject to a fine, or jail, the loss of boating privileges, and to attend an alcoholism treatment program. No child under 13 is allowed aboard any vessel when not wearing a Coast Guard-approved life preserver except when hunting waterfowl in an anchored boat. Operators shall be held responsible.
Nevada ,08 Subject to a fine, or jail, felony charges. Children under age 13.
New Hampshire ,08 Subject to class B misdemeanor, fines, boating privilege suspension, driver’s license suspension, anignition interlock device (IID), and or Impaired Driver Care Management Program. All children age 12 or under must wear an approved vest or jacket.
New Jersey ,08 Subject to fine, loss of the privilege to operate a vessel, forfeiture of your driver’s license. Any child 12 years of age or younger must WEAR a properly fitted U.S. Coast Guard approved PFD whenever the vessel is underway. If the child is inside a fully enclosed cabin that is a permanent, non-removable part of the vessel that is designed to carry passengers, then the child is not required to wear the PFD.
New Mexico ,08 Subject to jail, fines, boating safety course. A child age twelve or under who is aboard the vessel to wear a personal flotation device approved by the United States Coast Guard while the vessel is underway, unless the child is below deck or in an enclosed cabin.”
New York ,08 Subject to fines, imprisonment, suspension of operator privileges. Children under the age of 12 aboard pleasure vessels les than 65 feet in length, canoes, kayaks, or rowboats, unless in a totally enclosed cabin. Pleasure vessels less than 21 feet in length from November 1 to May 1.
North Carolina ,08 Subject to class 2 misdemeanors, a fine and or jail. No person may use a recreational vessel unless each child under 13 years old on board is wearing an appropriate PFD approved by the Coast Guard unless: Each child not wearing such a PFD is below decks or in an enclosed cabin. The vessel is not underway. (Vessels that are anchored or tied to shore are not underway.) This new law does not apply to commercial vessels.
North Dakota ,10 Subject to operator privileges may be revoked in addition to other penalties. All persons 10 years of age or younger present on the vessel, wear an appropriately sized and properly fastened U.S. Coast Guard approved type I, II or III wearable personal flotation device while the vessel is in operation.
Ohio ,08 Fine and or jail. Any child less than 10 years of age must wear a properly fitted life jacket.
Oklahoma ,08 A fine. Children under 13 years of age must wear a PFD whenever underway on a vessel less than 26 feet in length.
Oregon ,08 Losing boat privileges and fines. All children under 13 are required to wear a life jacket on boats less than 19 feet in length, unless in a fully enclosed area.
Pennsylvania ,02 Penalties include loss of boating privileges, significant fines and imprisonment. Children 12 years of age and younger on Commonwealth waters when underway on any boat 20 feet or less in length and in all canoes and kayaks.
Rhode Island ,08 Fines, fees, possible jail time, loss of operating privileges, and attendance at a boating safety course. A child under 13 years of age in a recreational vessel less than 65 feet (19.8 meters) in length on the waters of this state shall require that the child wear a wearable PFD approved by the U.S. Coast Guard while underway, unless below deck in a closed cabin.
South Carolina ,08 and less Subject to a fine, jail, community service, imprisonment, and suspension of boating privilege. Persons under the age of 12 must wear one at all times on vessels 16 feet in length or shorter.
South Dakota ,08 Subject to aclass 1 misdemeanor, fine, and or jail. Children on board under seven years of age is wearing as US Coast Guard approved PFD unless the chide is within a cable or below deck.
Tennessee ,08 A fine, jail, loosing operating privileges. Children 12 years of age and younger must wear a USCG-approved PFD at all times while on the open deck of a recreational vessel that is not anchored, moored, or aground.
Texas ,08 Fines and or jail. Children under 13 years of age in or on vessels under 26 feet must wear a U.S. Coast Guard approved wearable PFD while underway.
Utah ,08 and less (BUI) is the same as driving under the influence (DUI) and has the same penalties including suspension of driver license, possible jail time and fines. Passengers, 12-years-old and younger must wear a properly sized coast guard approved life jacket whenever a boat is in operation.
Vermont ,08 and less Subject to fines, jail time, or both; loss of operating privileges; and completion of an alcohol program. All boaters under the age of 12 must wear an approved U.S. Coast Guard Type I, II or III life jacket while underway on an open deck of any vessel. A person under 16 years of age a board a sailboard must be wearing a Type I, II, or III U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation device.
Virginia ,08 Fines, and or jail time, loss of operating privileges, attendance at an alcohol safety program any child under age 13 on the vessel unless each child is either: Wearing an appropriate life jacket approved by the Coast Guard; or Below deck or in an enclosed cabin.
Washington ,08 Fine and jail. Children ages 12 years and younger to wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket or vest on vessels less than 19 feet long.
West Virginia ,08 and less Subject to a misdemeanor and may receive a fine and time in jail, Children that are 12 years of age and under are required to wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket while on the deck of any boat that is underway.
Wisconsin ,08 Fine and or time in jail, and possible completion of a boating safety course Children under the age of 13 to wear a USCG-approved PFD while underway in an open vessel.
Wyoming ,10 Subject to a misdemeanor, time in jail, suspended boater’s operating privileges. Children 12 years of age and under are required to wear a life jacket while the watercraft is underway.
Washington District of Columbia ,08 Fine and or time in jail. Required when a vessel is underway, children under 13 years of age must wear their life jacket. Exceptions for when below deck or within an enclosed cabin. State laws may vary.
American Samoa Territory ,08 Revocation of motorboat license. Children 13 years of age and under are required to wear a life jacket while the watercraft is underway.
Guam Territory ,08 Revocation of motorboat license. Children 13 years of age and under are required to wear a life jacket while the watercraft is underway.
Northern Mariana Islands Territory n/a n/a n/a
Puerto Rico Territory n/a n/a Any child under 12 in a vessel while moving. All users of a PWC.
US Virgin Islands Territory n/a n/a n/a
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What is the minimum age you need to be to operate unsupervised a powered vessel that is capable of more than 10 knots?

Be a responsible skipper Every boat must have a skipper over the age of 15 if the vessel is capable of speeds in excess of 10 knots.

Which of the following vessels would be considered exempt from the registration in the state of Florida?

All vessels, with the exception of non-motor-powered vessels less than 16 feet in length, non-motor-powered canoes, kayaks, racing shells or rowing sculls, regardless of length, must be registered through your local Tax Collector’s Office, Letters must be separated from the numbers by a hyphen or space equal to letter width. The Certificate of Registration must be on board and available for inspection by an enforcement officer whenever the vessel is operated. Vessels must be registered and numbered within 30 days of purchase. Registration numbers must be displayed on the forward half of the vessel on both sides above the waterline. The numbers must be bold block letters at least 3″ high in a color contrasting to the hull. The vessel registration decal must be renewed annually and is to be displayed within 6 inches of, either before or after, the registration numbers on the port (left) side. Documented vessels without a state registration in full force and effect must also obtain a Florida registration and display the validation decal on the port side of the vessel when using Florida waters. Also see: flhsmv.gov

The operator of a vessel involved in a boating accident where there is personal injury beyond immediate first-aid, death, disappearance of any person under circumstances which indicate death or injury, or if there is damage to the vessel(s) and/or personal property of at least $2,000, must, by the quickest means possible, give notice to one of the following: the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the sheriff of the county in which the accident occurred, or the police chief of the municipality in which the accident occurred, if applicable. It is unlawful for any person operating a vessel involved in a boating accident to leave the scene without giving all possible aid to the involved persons and without reporting the accident to the proper authorities. Also see: FWC Boating Accident Statistics

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Anyone who operates a vessel with willful disregard for the safety of persons or property will be cited for reckless operation (a first-degree misdemeanor). All operators are responsible for operating their vessel in a reasonable and prudent manner with regard for other vessel traffic, posted restrictions, the presence of a divers-down flag and other circumstances so as not to endanger people outside of the vessel or property. Failure to do so is considered careless operation (a non-criminal infraction). A violation of the Federal Navigation Rules is also a violation of Florida law.

Florida law requires that anyone convicted of 2 non-criminal boating safety infractions within a 12-month period must enroll in, attend and successfully complete any NASBLA/State of Florida-approved boater education course. (“Attend” means you must attend a classroom course or take the course on-line.) This course must be completed following the date of the second violation, and proof of completion must be filed with the Commission’s Boating and Waterways Section. Any person convicted of a boating infraction which resulted in a reportable boating accident or convicted of any criminal boating violation must complete any NASBLA/State of Florida-approved boating safety course and also complete an approved safe boating course for violators. Violator courses require approximately 4 hours to complete and must be taken through a specified State of Florida-approved online course. A violator’s privilege to operate a vessel in Florida is suspended until proof of course completion is filed with the FWC. Frequently Asked Questions

The exhaust of every engine used on any airboat operated in Florida must use an automotive-style factory muffler, underwater exhaust, or other manufactured device capable of adequately muffling the sound of the engine exhaust. The use of cutouts or flex pipe as the sole source of muffling is prohibited. Airboats must be equipped with a mast or flagpole displaying a flag that is at least 10 feet above the lowest part of the boat. The flag must be square or rectangular, at least 10 inches by 12 inches in size, international orange in color, and displayed so it is visible from any direction.

Any vessel operating in a speed zone posted as “Idle Speed – No Wake” must operate at the minimum speed that allows the vessel to maintain headway and steerageway. Any vessel operating in a speed zone posted as “Slow Down – Minimum Wake” must operate fully off plane and completely settled in the water. The vessel’s wake must not be excessive nor create a hazard to other vessels.

It is a violation of Florida law to operate a vessel while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. A vessel operator suspected of boating under the influence must submit to sobriety tests and a physical or chemical test to determine blood- or breath-alcohol content. In Florida, a vessel operator is presumed to be under the influence if their blood- or breath-alcohol level is at or above,08. Any person under 21 years of age who is found to have a breath-alcohol level of,02 or higher and operates or is in actual physical control of a vessel is in violation of Florida law.

The operator of a vessel towing someone on skis or another aquaplaning device must either have an observer, in addition to the operator, on board who is attendant to the actions of the skier or have and use a wide-angle rear-view mirror. No one may ski or aquaplane between the hours of 1/2 hour past sunset and 1/2 hour before sunrise. No one may water ski or use another aquaplaning device unless they are wearing a U.S. Coast Guard-approved non-inflatable wearable personal flotation device (PFD). Inflatable PFDs are prohibited for skiing/aquaplaning. No one may ski or use another aquaplaning device while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. The operator of a vessel towing a skier may not pull the skier close enough to a fixed object or another vessel that there is risk of collision.

Each person operating, riding on, or being towed behind a personal watercraft must wear an approved non-inflatable wearable personal flotation device (PFD). Inflatable PFDs are prohibited for personal watercraft use. The operator of a personal watercraft must attach the engine cutoff switch lanyard (if equipped by the manufacturer) to his/her person, clothing or PFD. Personal watercraft may not be operated from 1/2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise, even if navigation lights are used. Remember, both federal and state law requires the use of navigation lights from sunset to sunrise. Maneuvering a personal watercraft by weaving through congested vessel traffic, jumping the wake of another vessel unreasonably close or when visibility around the vessel is obstructed, or swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision is classified as reckless operation of a vessel (a first-degree misdemeanor). A person must be at least 14 years of age to operate a personal watercraft in Florida. A person must be at least 18 years of age to rent a personal watercraft in Florida. It is unlawful for a person to knowingly allow a person under 14 years of age to operate a personal watercraft (a second-degree misdemeanor). Anyone born on or after January 1, 1988 is required to either have successfully completed a National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) approved boating education course or have passed a course equivalency or temporary certificate examination and have in their possession a boating education ID card and a photo identification card before operating a vessel with a motor of 10 HP or more in Florida. Identification cards for persons completing the course or the equivalency exam are good for a lifetime. Temporary Certificate exams are made available to the public through contractors. The temporary certificate is valid for 12 months from the issue date.

Except in the event of an emergency, it is unlawful to moor or fasten to any lawfully placed navigation aid or regulatory maker.

Anyone born on or after January 1, 1988 who operates a vessel powered by 10 horsepower or more must pass an approved boater safety course and have in his/her possession photographic identification and a boating safety education identification card issued by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The following operators are exempt:

A person licensed by the U.S. Coast Guard as a master of a vessel. A person operating on a private lake or pond. An operator who is accompanied onboard by a person who is least 18 years old and possesses the required Boating Safety Education Identification Card, provided that person is attendant to and responsible for the safe operation of the vessel. An operator who is accompanied onboard by a person who is exempt from the educational requirements, provided that person is attendant to and responsible for the safe operation of the vessel. A non-resident who has in his or her possession proof that he or she has completed a NASBLA-approved boater safety course or equivalency examination from another state. A person who is operating a vessel within 90 days after the purchase of that vessel, provided they have available for inspection aboard that vessel, a bill of sale meeting all the requirements as established in Chapter 328.46(1), Florida Statutes. A person operating a vessel within 90 days after completing an approved boating safety course, as required in Chapter 327.395(1), and has a photographic I.D. and a boater education course completion certificate showing proof of having completed the required boating safety education course. The course completion certificate must provide the student’s first and last name, date of birth, and the date the course was successfully completed. (Effective Oct.1, 2011.)

Please read our Frequently Asked Questions, See also Boat Safety Equipment, The following regulations apply whenever someone is wholly or partially submerged and is using a face mask and snorkel or underwater breathing apparatus. A divers-down warning device may be a divers-down flag, buoy, or other similar warning device.

The divers-down warning device must contain a divers-down symbol. The symbol is a red rectangle or square with a white diagonal stripe. If the symbol is a rectangle, the length may not be less than the height or more than 25% longer than the height. The width of the stripe must be 25% of the height of the symbol. If multiple stripes are displayed, all of the stripes must be oriented in the same direction. The size of the divers-down symbol depends on whether the divers-down warning device is displayed from the water or from a vessel. On the water, the divers-down symbol must be at least 12 x 12 inches in size. On a vessel, the symbol must be at least 20 x 24 inches in size. When displayed on a boat, the divers-down warning device also must be displayed at the highest point of the vessel so that its visibility is not obstructed in any direction. Divers-Down Instructions If the divers-down warning device is a flag, the divers-down symbol must be on each face and have a wire stiffener or be otherwise constructed to ensure it remains fully unfurled and extended, even when there is no wind or breeze. If the divers-down symbol is a buoy, the buoy must have three or four sides with the divers-down symbol displayed on each of the flat sides. The buoy must be prominently visible on the water’s surface and can’t displayed on the vessel. Boaters must make reasonable efforts to stay at least 300 feet away from divers-down warning devices in open water and at least 100 feet away in rivers, inlets, or navigation channels. Boaters approaching divers-down warning devices closer than 300 feet in open water and 100 feet in rivers, inlets, or navigation channels must slow down to idle speed. Divers-must make a reasonable effort to stay within 100 feet of a divers-down flag or a buoy within rivers, inlets, or navigation channels and within 300 feet on open water. A divers-down warning device may not be displayed when divers are out of the water.

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Except in the event of an emergency, it is unlawful for any person to anchor or operate a vessel in a manner that will unreasonably interfere with the navigation of other vessels

The owner and/or operator of a vessel is responsible to carry, store, maintain and use the safety equipment required by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). All vessels are required to have onboard a wearable USCG-approved personal flotation device (PFD) for each person. The PFDs must be of the appropriate size for the intended wearer, be in serviceable condition, and within easy access. The state of Florida urges all people onboard a boat to wear a life jacket. Vessels 16 feet in length or longer must also have at least one USCG-approved throwable Type IV PFD that is immediately available in case of a fall overboard. A child under the age of 6 must wear a USCG-approved Type I, II or III personal flotation device while onboard a vessel under 26 feet in length while the vessel is underway. “Underway” is defined as anytime except when the vessel is anchored, moored, made fast to the shore or aground. Vessels with built-in fuel tanks or enclosed compartments where gasoline fumes can accumulate are required to carry at least one fire extinguisher (depending upon vessel length) which is approved for marine use. All vessels are required to carry an efficient sound-producing device, such as a referee’s whistle. Vessels less than 16 feet in length are required to carry at least 3 visual distress signals approved for nighttime use when on coastal waters from sunset to sunrise. Vessels 16 feet or longer must carry at least 3 daytime and three nighttime visual distress signals (or 3 combination daytime/nighttime signals) at all times when on coastal waters. The use of sirens or flashing, occulting or revolving lights is prohibited except where expressly allowed by law. Recreational vessels are required to display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise and during periods of reduced visibility (fog, rain, haze, etc.). The U.S. Coast Guard Navigation Rules specify lighting requirements for every description of watercraft.

No person may operate a monohull boat of less than 20 feet in length while exceeding the maximum weight, persons, or horsepower capacity as displayed on the manufacturer’s capacity plate.

The facility is prohibited from renting a vessel that does not have proper safety equipment, exceeds the recommended horsepower or load capacity, or is not seaworthy. The facility must provide pre-rental or pre-ride instruction on the safe operation of the vessel with a motor of 10 horsepower or more. This instruction must include, at a minimum, operational characteristics of the vessel, safe operation and right-of-way, operator responsibilities and local waterway characteristics. The person delivering this information must have completed a NASBLA/state-approved boater safety course. All renters required by law to have a boater education ID card must have the card or its equivalent before the facility may rent to them. The livery must display boating safety information in a place visible to the renting public in accordance with FWC guidelines. PWC liveries must provide on-the-water demonstration and a check ride to evaluate the proficiency of renters. PWC liveries may not enter into rental agreement with anyone under the age of 18. PWC liveries must display safety information on the proper operation of a PWC. The information must include: propulsion, steering and stopping characteristics of jet pump vessels, the location and content of warning labels, how to re-board a PWC, the applicability of the Navigation Rules to PWC operation, problems with seeing and being seen by other boaters, reckless operation, and noise, nuisance and environmental concerns. Frequently Asked Questions

Vessels operating in Florida waters must comply with the U.S. Coast Guard requirements relating to marine sanitation devices, where applicable.

All vessels must be equipped with an effective muffling device. The use of cutouts is prohibited, except for vessels competing in a regatta or official boat race and such vessels while on trial runs.

Law enforcement officers of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, sheriffs’ deputies of the various counties, municipal police officers, and all other law enforcement officers, as defined in section 943.10, Florida Statutes, have the authority to order the removal or relocation of vessels deemed to be an interference with navigation or a hazard to public safety; to enforce all boating safety laws; and to conduct vessel inspections in accordance with state law. A law enforcement officer may stop any vessel to check for compliance with boating safety equipment and registration requirements and to conduct resource inspections in accordance with state law.

Manatees are protected by state and federal law. It is illegal to harass, hunt, capture or kill any marine mammal, including manatees. Anything that disrupts a manatee’s normal behavior is a violation of law, punishable under federal law up to a $50,000 fine, one-year imprisonment, or both. Boaters must observe all manatee protection zone requirements. Boaters who accidentally strike a manatee are urged to report the strike to the FWC and may not be subject to prosecution, provided they were operating in accordance with any applicable vessel speed restrictions at the time of the strike.

Seagrasses are the principal food for endangered marine herbivores such as manatees and green sea turtles, act as natural filters to help purify the water, and provide a suitable environment for a wide variety of marine life. Boaters should make all available attempts to avoid running through seagrass beds. Navigation charts identify seagrass beds as light green or marked as “grs” on the chart. Boaters should make all possible attempts to stay within channels when unfamiliar with a waterway. Avoid taking shortcuts through seagrass beds to avoid causing propeller scars. It is a violation of Florida law to damage seagrass beds in some areas within state waters.

What is recommended practice for PWC operation?

How they work – PWCs are operated by two-cycle inboard gasoline engines that drive a jet water pump. Water is taken in through a water pick-up on the bottom of the PWC, drawn into an internal propeller (an impeller) that creates a jet of high pressure water which exits through a nozzle on the back of the PWC.

There is also a moveable “gate” that can be dropped over the nozzle to provide reverse thrust on some models. Be careful, this is not designed to be used to stop a PWC operating at a high speed. PWCs are designed to be extremely maneuverable. They are built for quick, sharp turns, low-radius circling, and rapid acceleration.

However, they are only maneuverable with the throttle engaged – TO MAINTAIN STEERAGE, YOU MUST APPLY THROTTLE! For instance, the best way to avoid hitting an object is NOT to slow down, rather, you should apply throttle and steer away to avoid impact.

PWCs are self-righting if you fall off. Don’t abandon your vessel if it overturns. Simply turn it over on the direction marked on the hull or as indicated in the user’s manual that you read prior to use. Righting your craft improperly may make it more difficult than necessary to re-board, and you could cause internal damage to your PWC.

To re-board your craft, approach the rear of the PWC, pull yourself up into a kneeling position, take your seat, start it up and continue on your trip. This sounds easier than it is – it is often quite difficult to re-board a PWC, especially in rough water or when fatigued.

A good idea is to practice in calm shallow water before venturing out. Most models have an automatic cut-off lanyard (which must be attached to the operator’s wrist or life jacket at all times) or self-circling feature to prevent a PWC from going far from a driver who has fallen off. Practice boarding your PWC in a calm, shallow area with your friends or family.

If you have difficulty getting back on a PWC from the water, you should most likely avoid using your PWC in areas where there is a strong current or high waves. There are “ladders” available to help you climb back on – definitely a worthwhile investment.

Which of the following is required on federally controlled waters for boats less than 39.4 feet?

In periods of reduced visibility or whenever a vessel operator needs to signal his or her intentions or position, a sound-producing device is essential. For example, sound signals are required when meeting head-on, crossing, or overtaking. Although not required on most state waters, sound-producing devices are required on federally controlled waters.

Vessels less than 39.4 feet (12 meters) in length, which includes PWC, must have some way of making an efficient sound signal. Examples are a handheld air horn, an athletic whistle, an installed horn, etc. A human voice is not acceptable. Vessels that are 39.4 feet (12 meters) or more in length must have a sound-producing device that can produce an efficient sound signal. The sound signal should be audible for one-half mile and should last for 4 to 6 seconds.

Which of the following activities is illegal for PWC to participate in while the PWC is underway?

Under Wisconsin Law, What Is Required For Persons 12 To 15 Years Old To Operate A Pwc Legally It is strongly recommended that PWC are operated only during daylight hours. If a PWC is operated at night (sunset to sunrise), the PWC must display the required navigation lights. It is illegal to operate a PWC while you are under the influence of alcohol or drugs. PWC must be operated in a careful and responsible manner. Specifically, it is illegal for PWC operators to:

Weave the PWC through congested waterway traffic. Jump the wake of another motorboat when visibility is obstructed. Become airborne while crossing the wake of another motorboat and within 100 feet of that motorboat. Operate at greater than “slow, no wake speed” within 50 feet of any other vessel, PWC, or person in the water. Operate in a manner that requires swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision.

What is the minimum seating capacity a PWC must have before it can be used for water skiing?

As an observer is required, cruising PWC seating two or more can be used for watersKiing. The same rules apply to PWC as to other boats involved in watersKiing (see page 65).

What hours is it legal to operate a PWC in Wisconsin?

Under Wisconsin Law, What Is Required For Persons 12 To 15 Years Old To Operate A Pwc Legally In Wisconsin, these are the operating laws for PWC.

A PWC may not be operated between sunset and sunrise. A PWC operator must always face forward. A PWC may not be operated at faster than “slow, no wake speed” within:

100 feet of any other vessel on any waterbody 100 feet of a dock, pier, raft, or restricted area on any lake 200 feet of shore on any lake

A PWC must be operated in a responsible manner. Maneuvers that endanger people or property are prohibited, including:

Jumping a wake with a PWC within 100 feet of another vessel Operating within 100 feet of a vessel that is towing a person on water skis, inner tube, wakeboard, or similar device, or operating within 100 feet of the tow rope or person being towed Weaving your PWC through congested waterway traffic Steering toward another object or person in the water and swerving at the last possible moment in order to avoid collision Chasing, harassing, or disturbing wildlife with your PWC

Which of the following is considered correct and safe operation of a PWC?

PWC Operation is safe and acceptable in which of the following conditions: When the PWC is overloaded. At night. During daylight, when visibility is clear and the PWC is operated at safe speeds.

Which of the following actions is illegal for PWC?

Under Wisconsin Law, What Is Required For Persons 12 To 15 Years Old To Operate A Pwc Legally It is strongly recommended that PWC are operated only during daylight hours. If a PWC is operated at night (sunset to sunrise), the PWC must display the required navigation lights. It is illegal to operate a PWC while you are under the influence of alcohol or drugs. PWC must be operated in a careful and responsible manner. Specifically, it is illegal for PWC operators to:

Weave the PWC through congested waterway traffic. Jump the wake of another motorboat when visibility is obstructed. Become airborne while crossing the wake of another motorboat and within 100 feet of that motorboat. Operate at greater than “slow, no wake speed” within 50 feet of any other vessel, PWC, or person in the water. Operate in a manner that requires swerving at the last possible moment to avoid collision.