What Is The Lemon Law In Arizona?

What Is The Lemon Law In Arizona
Your car is covered by the Arizona Used Car Lemon Law if a major component of your car breaks before the earlier of 15 days or 500 miles after you buy the car. If it breaks, you’ll still have to pay up to $25 for the first two repairs. The recovery for the consumer is the purchase amount paid for the car.

What qualifies for lemon law Arizona?

Vehicles Covered A self-propelled vehicle designated primarily for the transportation of persons or property over the public highways. Only the chassis portion of a motor home is covered. Repair Interval and Coverage Period

  • 4 repair attempts or 30 calendar days out of service.
  • Warranty period, 2 years or 24,000 miles.

Arizona consumers with lemon vehicles may be protected under either the Arizona Lemon Law, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (the federal lemon law), or both. Remedies may include refund, replacement or cash compensation such as diminished value and/or incidental and consequential damages.

  • Attorneys’ fees also available meaning qualified consumers may receive Arizona lemon law attorney representation at no cost.
  • And even if a vehicle doesn’t qualify under a lemon law statute, other car buying laws or consumer protection statutes such as the Truth In Lending Act may provide an avenue to recover cash damages that can help you trade out or pay for repairs.

Connect here for a free, no obligation Arizona Lemon Law case review. In most instances to qualify under a lemon law your vehicle must only have an unreasonable repair history under the warranty, including (but not limited to) 3-4 repair attempts for the same problem, 6 repairs total on the vehicle, or 30 days out of service by reason of repair.

  • A.R.S.44-1261. Definitions; Exemptions
  • A.R.S.44-1262. New Motor Vehicle; Repair During Express Warranty or two Years or Twenty-Four Thousand Miles
  • A.R.S.44-1263. Inability to Conform Motor Vehicle to Express Warranty; Replacement of Vehicle or Refund of Monies; Affirmative Defenses; Tax Refund
  • A.R.S.44-1264. Reasonable Number of Attempts to Conform Motor Vehicle to Express Warranty; Presumption
  • A.R.S.44-1265. Nonlimitation of Rights; Refund or Replacement not Required if Certain Procedures not Followed; Attorney Fees
  • A.R.S.44-1266. Notice to Dealers and Prospective Purchasers
  • A.R.S.44-1267. Used Motor Vehicles; Title; Implied Warranty of Merchantability Disclaimer; Waiver; Burden of Proof; Remedies

Arizona Lemon Law Statutes.A.R.S.44-1261. Definitions; Exemptions

  1. In this article, unless the context otherwise requires:
    1. “Consumer” means the purchaser, other than for purposes of resale, of a motor vehicle, any person to whom the motor vehicle is transferred during the duration of an express warranty applicable to the motor vehicle or any other person entitled by the terms of the warranty to enforce the obligations of the warranty.
    2. “Motor vehicle” means a self-propelled vehicle designated primarily for the transportation of persons or property over the public highways.
    3. “Used motor vehicle” means a motor vehicle that has been sold, bargained, exchanged or given away or the title to which has been transferred from the person who first acquired the vehicle from the manufacturer, importer or dealer or agent of the manufacturer or importer and that has been placed in bona fide consumer use.
    4. “Used motor vehicle dealer” means a person or business that sells or offers for sale a used motor vehicle after selling or offering for sale four or more used motor vehicles in the previous twelve months but does not include a bank or financial institution, an insurance company, a business selling a used motor vehicle to an employee of that business, a lessor selling a leased vehicle by or to the lessee of that vehicle or to an employee of the lessee of that vehicle or a person who buys, sells, exchanges or offers or attempts to negotiate a sale of or exchange an interest in a classic car as defined in § 28-2483 or a historic vehicle as defined in § 28-2484.
  2. If the motor vehicle is a motor home, the provisions of this article shall apply to the self-propelled vehicle and chassis but not to those portions of the vehicle designed, used or maintained primarily as a mobile dwelling, office or commercial space.
  3. The provisions of this article do not apply to a sale of a motor vehicle to a purchaser for the purpose of resale for profit or to a motor vehicle with a declared gross weight over ten thousand pounds or that is sold at a public auction.

Return to Top Arizona Lemon Law Rights.A.R.S.44-1262. new Motor Vehicle; Repair During Express Warranty or Two Years or Twenty-Four Thousand Miles

  1. If a new motor vehicle does not conform to all applicable express warranties:
    1. A consumer shall report the nonconformity to the manufacturer, its agent or its authorized dealer or issuer of a warranty during the shorter of the following:
      1. The term of the express warranty.
      2. The period of two years or twenty-four thousand miles following the date of original delivery of the motor vehicle to the consumer, whichever is earlier.
    2. The manufacturer, its agent or its authorized dealer or the issuer of a warranty shall make those repairs that are necessary to conform the motor vehicle to such express warranties, even if the repairs are made after the expiration of the term or two year period or twenty-four thousand mile limit.
  2. This section does not limit in any way the remedies available to a consumer under a new motor vehicle warranty that extends beyond the limits prescribed in this section.

Return to Top Arizona new Car Lemon Law.A.R.S.44-1263. Inability to Conform Motor Vehicle to Express Warranty; Replacement of Vehicle or Refund of Monies; Affirmative Defenses; Tax Refund

  1. If the manufacturer, its agents or its authorized dealers are unable to conform the motor vehicle to any applicable express warranty by repairing or correcting any defect or condition which substantially impairs the use and value of the motor vehicle to the consumer after a reasonable number of attempts, the manufacturer shall replace the motor vehicle with a new motor vehicle or accept return of the motor vehicle from the consumer and refund to the consumer the full purchase price, including all collateral charges, less a reasonable allowance for the consumer’s use of the vehicle. The manufacturer shall make refunds to the consumer and lienholder, if any, as their interests appear. A reasonable allowance for use is that amount directly attributable to use by the consumer before his first written report of the nonconformity to the manufacturer, agent or dealer and during any subsequent period when the vehicle is not out of service by reason of repair.
  2. It is an affirmative defense to any claim under this article that either:
    1. An alleged nonconformity does not substantially impair the use and market value of the motor vehicle.
    2. A nonconformity is the result of abuse, neglect or unauthorized modifications or alterations of the motor vehicle.
  3. In the case of taxes paid pursuant to title 42, chapter 5,1 if the manufacturer:
    1. Accepts return of a motor vehicle from a consumer without replacing the motor vehicle, the manufacturer shall refund the amount of tax attributed to the sale of the vehicle to that consumer.
    2. Replaces a motor vehicle with a new motor vehicle of lesser value, the manufacturer shall refund the difference between the original amount of tax attributed to the sale of that vehicle and the amount of tax attributed to the sale of the replacement vehicle, excluding the value of the motor vehicle being replaced.
    3. Replaces a motor vehicle with a new motor vehicle of greater value, the manufacturer shall calculate the gross proceeds of sales pursuant to § 42-5001, paragraph 6.
  4. Pursuant to § 42-1118, subsection F, the manufacturer may apply to the department of revenue for a refund for the amount of tax that the manufacturer properly refunds to the consumer.

Return to Top Arizona Automobile Lemon Law.A.R.S.44-1264. Reasonable Number of Attempts to Conform Motor Vehicle to Express Warranty; Presumption

  1. It is presumed that a reasonable number of attempts have been undertaken to conform a motor vehicle to the applicable express warranties if either:
    1. The same nonconformity has been subject to repair four or more times by the manufacturer or its agents or authorized dealers during the shorter of the express warranty term or the period of two years or twenty-four thousand miles following the date of original delivery of the motor vehicle to the consumer, whichever is earlier, but the nonconformity continues to exist.
    2. The motor vehicle is out of service by reason of repair for a cumulative total of thirty or more calendar days during the shorter of the express warranty term or the two year period or twenty-four thousand miles, whichever is earlier.
  2. The term of an express warranty, the two year period and the thirty day period are extended by any period of time during which repair services are not available to the consumer because of any war, invasion, strike, fire, flood or other natural disaster.
  3. The presumption prescribed in this section does not apply against a manufacturer unless the manufacturer has received prior direct written notification from or on behalf of the consumer of the alleged defect and has had an opportunity to cure the alleged defect.
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Return to Top Arizona Vehicle Lemon Law.A.R.S.44-1265. Nonlimitation of Rights; Refund or Replacement not Required if Certain Procedures not Followed; Attorney Fees

  1. If a manufacturer has established or participates in an informal dispute settlement procedure which complies in all respects with 16 Code of Federal Regulations part 703, § 44-1263 relating to refunds or replacement does not apply to any consumer who has not first resorted to such a procedure.
  2. A consumer shall begin an action under this article within six months following the earlier of expiration of the express warranty term or two years or twenty-four thousand miles following the date of original delivery of the motor vehicle to the consumer, whichever is earlier. If a consumer prevails in an action under this article, the court shall award the consumer reasonable costs and attorney fees.

Return to Top Arizona Lemon Law Statutes.A.R.S.44-1266. Notice to Dealers and Prospective Purchasers

  1. A manufacturer who has been ordered by judgment or decree to replace or repurchase or who has replaced or repurchased a motor vehicle pursuant to this article or the repair or replace laws of another state shall, before offering the motor vehicle for resale, attach to the motor vehicle written notification indicating the motor vehicle has been replaced or repurchased. A consumer has a cause of action against any person who removes the written notification from the motor vehicle, except as provided in subsection B of this section.
  2. A motor vehicle dealer, broker, wholesale motor vehicle dealer or wholesale motor vehicle auction dealer as defined in § 28-4301 who offers for sale a motor vehicle that has been replaced or repurchased pursuant to this article or the repair or replace laws of another state shall provide the purchaser with the manufacturer’s written notification indicating that the motor vehicle has been replaced or repurchased before completion of the sale.
  3. It shall constitute an affirmative defense in an action brought pursuant to subsection A of this section against a motor vehicle dealer or an agent of a motor vehicle dealer that the notification described in subsection A of this section was removed by someone other than the dealer or agent without the knowledge of the dealer or agent.

Return to Top Arizona Used Car Lemon Law.A.R.S.44-1267. Used Motor Vehicles; Title; Implied Warranty of Merchantability Disclaimer; Waiver; Burden of Proof; Remedies

  1. Before the seller attempts to sell a used motor vehicle the seller shall possess the title to the used motor vehicle and the title shall be in the seller’s name.
  2. Except as provided in subsection I of this section and in addition to the requirements of § 28-4412, a used motor vehicle dealer shall not exclude, modify or disclaim the implied warranty of merchantability prescribed in § 47-2314 or limit the remedies for a breach of that warranty, except as otherwise provided in this section, before midnight of the fifteenth calendar day after delivery of a used motor vehicle or until a used motor vehicle is driven five hundred miles after delivery, whichever is earlier. In calculating time under this subsection, a day on which the warranty is breached is excluded and all subsequent days in which the motor vehicle fails to conform with the implied warranty of merchantability are also excluded. In calculating distance under this subsection, the miles driven to obtain or in connection with the repair, servicing or testing of the motor vehicle that fails to conform with the implied warranty of merchantability are excluded. An attempt to exclude, modify or disclaim the implied warranty of merchantability or to limit the remedies for a breach of that warranty, except as otherwise provided in this section, in violation of this subsection renders a purchase agreement voidable at the option of the purchaser.
  3. For the purposes of this section, the implied warranty of merchantability is met if the motor vehicle functions in a safe condition as provided in title 28, chapter 3, article 161 and is substantially free of any defect that significantly limits the use of the motor vehicle for the ordinary purpose of transportation on any public highway. The implied warranty of merchantability expires at midnight of the fifteenth calendar day after delivery of a used motor vehicle or when a used motor vehicle has been driven five hundred miles after delivery, whichever is earlier. In calculating time under this subsection, a day on which the warranty is breached is excluded and all subsequent days in which the motor vehicle fails to conform with the implied warranty of merchantability are also excluded. In calculating distance under this subsection, the miles driven to obtain or in connection with the repair, servicing or testing of the motor vehicle that fails to conform with the implied warranty of merchantability are excluded.
  4. The implied warranty of merchantability described in this section does not extend to damage that occurs after the sale of the motor vehicle and that is the result of any abuse, misuse, neglect, failure to perform regular maintenance or to maintain adequate oil, coolant or other required fluid or lubricant or off road use, racing or towing.
  5. If the implied warranty of merchantability described in this section is breached, the purchaser shall give reasonable notice to the seller. Before the purchaser exercises any other remedies under title 47, chapter 2,2 the seller shall have a reasonable opportunity to repair the vehicle. The purchaser shall pay one-half of the cost of the first two repairs necessary to bring the vehicle in compliance with the warranty. The purchaser’s payments are limited to a maximum payment of twenty-five dollars for each repair.
  6. The maximum liability of the seller under this section is limited to the purchase price paid for the used motor vehicle.
  7. An agreement for the sale of a used motor vehicle by a used motor vehicle dealer is voidable at the option of the purchaser unless it contains on its face the following conspicuous statement printed in bold-faced ten point or larger type set off from the body of the agreement: The seller hereby warrants that this vehicle will be fit for the ordinary purposes for which the vehicle is used for 15 days or 500 miles after delivery, whichever is earlier, except with regard to particular defects disclosed on the first page of this agreement. You (the purchaser) will have to pay up to $25.00 for each of the first two repairs if the warranty is violated.
  8. The inclusion of the statement prescribed in subsection G of this section in the agreement does not create an express warranty.
  9. A purchaser of a used motor vehicle may waive the implied warranty of merchantability described in this section only for a particular defect in the vehicle and only if all of the following conditions are satisfied:
    1. The used motor vehicle dealer fully and accurately discloses to the purchaser that because of circumstances unusual to the used motor vehicle dealer’s business, the used motor vehicle has a particular defect.
    2. The purchaser agrees to buy the used motor vehicle after disclosure of the defect.
    3. Before the sale, the purchaser indicates agreement to the waiver by signing and dating the following conspicuous statement that is printed on the first page of the sales agreement in bold-faced ten point or larger type and that is written in the language in which the presentation was made: Attention purchaser: sign here only if the dealer told you that this vehicle has the following problem(s) and that you agree to buy the vehicle on those terms: 1._ 2._ 3._
  10. The dealer has the burden to prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the dealer complied with subsection I of this section.
  11. Any purchaser or seller who is aggrieved by a transaction pursuant to this section and who seeks a legal remedy shall pursue any appropriate remedy prescribed in title 47, chapter 2 and shall comply with the requirements prescribed in title 47, chapter 2.
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Return to Top Consumer Protection Attorneys

  • Thompson Consumer Law Group PLLC Managing Attorney Russell S. Thompson IV, Bar No: 029098
  • David McDevitt, Bar No: 030761
  • Jose Gill, Bar No: 028518
  • Marshall Meyers, Bar No.020584

To connect with the Thompson Consumer Law Group PLLC for a FREE CASE REVIEW or more information: Call : Toll Free (888) 565-3666 Email : [email protected] Thompson Consumer Law Group offers Lemon Law representation as co-counsel with the Weisberg Consumer Law Group PA. Click here for more information about these law firms and how they may be able to help you.

How long do you have to return a car in AZ?

There is NO cooling-off period for motor vehicle purchases in Arizona. While a cooling-off period exists for some types of purchases, motor vehicles are not included. The Arizona Lemon Law protects the legal rights of motor vehicle purchasers who buy defective cars.

How long is a used car warranty?

2. Check if the manufacturer’s warranty still applies – There’s a chance that a manufacturer’s warranty still applies when you buy a used vehicle. You may be able to find this under the “systems covered/duration” section of the Buyers Guide. To reap the benefits of any warranty that’s included, you have to know what’s in it and confirm that it’s transferrable.

Does Arizona have a Lemon Law for new cars?

What is Arizona lemon law? – Lemon Laws are meant to protect consumers who have purchased defective vehicles. These laws may be different depending on which state you live in, In Arizona, the Lemon Laws allow consumers who have purchased used or new vehicles to pursue compensation or replacement if their vehicle is a lemon.

Is there a buyers remorse law in Arizona?

Arizona law does not require dealers to give used car buyers a three-day right to cancel. The right to return the car in a few days for a refund exists only if the dealer grants this privilege to buyers.

Can I get a refund on a faulty used car?

If you buy a new or used car from a dealer and have problems with it, you have some statutory rights under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, The Act states the car must be “of a satisfactory quality”, “fit for purpose” and “as described”. (For a used car, “satisfactory quality” takes into account the car’s age and mileage.) You have a right to reject something faulty and you’re entitled to a full refund within 30 days of purchase in most cases.

After 30 days, you lose the short-term right to reject the goods. You’ll also have fewer rights, such as only being able to ask for a repair or replacement, or a partial refund. In fact, you’re legally allowed to return it up to six years after you bought it (in Scotland, it’s five years after you first realised there was a problem).

But it gets more difficult to prove a fault and not normal wear and tear is the cause of any problem. Just because you didn’t buy your car new, doesn’t mean you don’t have rights if something goes wrong. You might still have a legal right to compensation.

when and where you bought it what the exact problem is whether you knew there was a problem when you bought it. This might be a repair, an amount of money to cover the cost of a repair, or a full or partial refund of the money you spent.

Citizens Advice have a tool that tells you what your consumer rights are. All you need is the date you bought your car and whether it was a private sale or bought through a trade seller. The vehicle should be of satisfactory quality, fit for its purpose and as described.

  1. With hire purchase, it’s the finance provider, rather than the dealer, who’s legally responsible if there are problems with the car.
  2. If you paid all or part of the cost of your car by credit card, the card company and the trader might be jointly responsible for compensating you under Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974.

Your purchase won’t be covered by Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act. But you might be able to claim a refund from your debit card provider through a voluntary scheme known as ‘chargeback’. Visa, MasterCard, Maestro and American Express are among the companies signed up to chargeback.

Depending on the card you used, you’ll probably need to make your claim within 120 days of noticing the problem. Chargeback claims can take some time to process because the card company has to get the money refunded before they can pass it on to you. Buying privately is one of the riskiest ways of buying a car.

If something goes wrong with it you don’t have as much legal protection as you would if you’d bought the car from a dealer. The car must match the seller’s description, be roadworthy and the seller must have the legal right to sell it to you. In other words, the car must work, meet the legal requirements for being driven on public roads, and be owned by the seller.

  1. But you’re responsible for ensuring the car is “of satisfactory quality” and “fit for purpose” before you buy it.
  2. Watch out for any unscrupulous sellers pretending to be private owners so they can offload faulty or stolen cars.
  3. With online auctions, your legal rights depend on whether the seller is a private individual or a car dealer.

If the seller is a private individual, the car only needs to be as described – so it’s a case of ‘buyer beware’. Your legal rights are the same as if you were buying from them in person (see ‘Problems with used cars bought privately’ above). If the seller is a dealer, you’ll be protected by the Sale of Goods Act if you find the car isn’t of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose or as described.

Can I return a car I just bought AZ?

You might have heard there is a federal cooling-off rule for some purchases. There is such a rule, but it is primarily meant to protect consumers from high-pressure door-to-door sales tactics. It explicitly doesn’t apply to automobiles. In other words, if you signed the sales contract, you own the car.

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What can void a used car warranty?

Edmunds: What actions can void your new car warranty? A new car limited warranty, sometimes called a “bumper-to-bumper” warranty, is a contract between the vehicle owner and the automaker. It promises to take care of any applicable repairs provided that the owner properly maintains the vehicle.

But like most contracts, a warranty can be broken if one person doesn’t hold up his or her end of the bargain. That’s why it’s important to know what circumstances can void that coverage. Any time you take your vehicle to the dealership for warranty work, the dealer must file a claim with the manufacturer or warranty provider.

That’s how it gets paid for the work performed under warranty. If a repair isn’t covered under the manufacturer’s warranty, the claim will be denied and the dealer will come to you to pay for the work out of your own pocket. Here are a few reasons how your warranty claim can be denied and tips on how to avoid any issues down the road.

  • WHAT VOIDS THE ENTIRE WARRANTY? Salvage title: If your car was in a severe accident and was given a salvage title or declared a total loss, your entire warranty is voided.
  • Eep this in mind if you are looking to purchase a late-model used car from a private party or an independent used car lot.
  • If you are unsure about a car’s past, we suggest getting a vehicle history report.

Misuse of the vehicle: This term can be interpreted in a number of ways and often includes racing or competition of any type, overloading the vehicle, or going off-road if the vehicle wasn’t designed to. Some automakers will void your warranty for these infractions, and this decision is typically left to the discretion of the warranty administrator.

Even if there is no proof and only signs of abuse, your warranty claim may be denied. Environmental damage: If your vehicle was damaged in a fire, flood, hailstorm, earthquake or any other environmental disaster, the automaker will not honor your warranty. Altered odometer: If your car’s odometer has been disconnected, tampered with or replaced, the dealership cannot determine the exact mileage.

This is usually grounds for a voided warranty. Make sure to run a vehicle history report before buying a used car to check for any mileage inconsistencies. WHAT VOIDS YOUR WARRANTY CLAIM? Not every situation will void your entire warranty. In some situations, the repairs for a specific part will not be covered, but you still retain the warranty on the remainder of the vehicle.

Neglect: Some people are so oblivious to the needs of their vehicle, they have gone years without having the vehicle’s oil changed. If your car is under warranty, avoid this at all costs. If you fail to take your vehicle in for service during its scheduled maintenance, the dealer is not responsible for repairing any damage to the engine.

Use of dirty or improper fluids: If you never change your oil or if you spaced out and put diesel fuel in your gasoline engine, any damage incurred is not covered under warranty. Always make sure you are using the correct fluids as outlined in your owner’s manual and change them at the recommended intervals.

Damage caused by modifications or aftermarket parts: This aspect of warranty coverage is contentious for many customers. An aftermarket modification can be anything from a lift kit for a truck to a cheap off-brand replacement part. While some dealers would have you think otherwise, simply having an aftermarket part or modifying your vehicle cannot void your warranty.

However, if that part led to something breaking on the vehicle, the dealership can deny your warranty claim. In these scenarios, the burden of proof is on the dealership to prove the aftermarket part was not properly installed or a modification led to a component failure.

  1. TIPS TO AVOID WARRANTY ISSUES Read your warranty coverage: Though we hit on some of the major issues, we still recommend reading your warranty’s fine print.
  2. Find the section that says “What is not covered” or “Warranty limitations.” Service your car at regular intervals: This is a good idea in general, but for the sake of keeping your warranty intact, follow the manufacturer’s recommended service schedule.

If you misplaced your owner’s manual, you can often find it online. Keep all service records and receipts: This is another good habit to keep in case you want to sell your vehicle, but also to have proof that you maintained your vehicle. If you perform maintenance on the car yourself, save the receipts for the parts and fluids you bought.

  • EDMUNDS SAYS: In many cases, warranties are open to interpretation.
  • If you think that a service adviser has denied your warranty claim unfairly, you can always go higher up in the management chain, contact the automaker directly or go to another dealer altogether.
  • This story was provided to The Associated Press by the automotive website Edmunds.

Ronald Montoya is a senior consumer advice editor at Edmunds. Twitter: @ronald_montoya8. Related links: ; Edmunds : Edmunds: What actions can void your new car warranty?

Do second hand car dealers have to give a warranty?

Dealer-provided warranty – There is no legal obligation for car dealers to provide any kind of warranty, but many independent dealers will offer their own with the used cars they sell. How long these warranties last for can vary depending both on the dealer, and on how old the car is (with newer cars typically having longer warranties), while you may be given a warranty for free, or be offered the option to buy one.

On what grounds can you reject a new car?

Short-term right to reject – Under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, you have a short term right to reject your car if it is of unsatisfactory quality, unfit for purpose or not as described. You can get a full refund. However, you should remember that this right is short-term and is only limited to 30 days from the date you brought your car.

Can a mechanic keep your car AZ?

What Is The Lemon Law In Arizona Yes, a mechanic can keep your car if you don’t pay. This is a form of security interest known as a mechanic’s lien. The mechanic’s lien exists to protect a mechanic from having a customer leave with their vehicle and then refuse to pay for the repairs.

How long does a dealer have to pay off your trade in Arizona?

The dealer also knows they have 20 days to pay off your trade-in. Every day they’re late paying off your vehicle, they’ll have to add $3.34 until the vehicle’s paid off. Once they pay off your trade with the lender, they’ll receive the title and then be able to retail or wholesale your traded vehicle.

What is the Arizona Lemon Law for used cars?

Used Car. Your car is covered by the Arizona Used Car Lemon Law if a major component of your car breaks before the earlier of 15 days or 500 miles after you buy the car. If it breaks, you’ll still have to pay up to $25 for the first two repairs. The recovery for the consumer is the purchase amount paid for the car.

Does Lemon Law apply to private sales in Arizona?

The “Lemon Law” – If you buy a defective vehicle, the car dealership you purchased from is responsible for your repairs under the Arizona Lemon Law. However, this law does not apply to private purchases or vehicles sold at a public auction. So, do not be swayed if a potential seller mentions the Lemon Law in your discussion. ​