What Is The Lemon Law In Michigan?

What Is The Lemon Law In Michigan
Questions and Answers About the Lemon Law – Question: Which vehicles are covered by Michigan’s Lemon Law? Answer: The Lemon Law applies to passenger vehicles, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and vans that are purchased or leased in Michigan or purchased or leased by a Michigan resident (regardless of whether the vehicle was purchased or leased in Michigan) and covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease.

The Lemon Law does not apply to motor homes, buses, trucks other than pickups and vans, motorcycles, or off-road vehicles. Question: What about used vehicles? Answer: This is tricky. Generally, the Lemon Law does not apply to used vehicles. But the Lemon Law does apply to a vehicle still “covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease,” if the problem is reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer within one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser.

Thus, the Lemon Law may apply to a “used” vehicle that meets these criteria. Question: To whom does Michigan’s Lemon Law apply? Answer: The lemon law applies to a person who:

    1. Purchases or leases a new motor vehicle for personal, family, or household use and not to sell or lease the new motor vehicle to another person;
    2. Purchases or leases less than 10 new motor vehicles a year;
    3. Purchases or leases 10 or more new motor vehicles a year only if the vehicles are purchased or leased for personal, family, or household use; or
    4. Is entitled to enforce the provisions of an express warranty pursuant to the terms of that warranty.

A “person” under the Lemon Law is a natural person, a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, association, unit or agency of government, trust, estate, or other legal entity. Question: Under the Lemon Law, do I have a right to return my vehicle within three days of purchase? Answer: No.

Many consumers mistakenly believe that a “cooling off period” that allows you to cancel some written contracts in very limited circumstances applies to all purchases. On the contrary, as a general matter of contract law, consumers do not have the right to cancel a sale of goods or services. To learn more about the limited right to contract cancellation, read the Attorney General’s Consumer Alert, I Changed My Mind – Can I Cancel This Contract ? Some dealers offer extended test drives and allow customers to take vehicles home overnight or for a few days, but that is a promotional tactic and not a matter of contract law.

The remedies provided by the Lemon Law, which include the right to return your vehicle and receive a refund of the purchase or lease price, are not triggered until the vehicle is subjected to a reasonable number of repairs—which will occur well beyond three days after your purchase.

Question: What problems or defects does the Lemon Law cover? Answer: The Lemon Law covers any defect or condition that impairs the use or value of the new motor vehicle to the consumer or prevents the new motor vehicle from conforming to the manufacturer’s express warranty. The Lemon Law does not cover any defect or condition that is the result of a modification not installed or made by or for the manufacturer, or abuse or neglect of the new motor vehicle, or damage due to an accident occurring after the new motor vehicle’s purchase or lease.

Question: What is the first step to recovering under the Lemon Law? Answer: To recover under the Lemon Law, you must first report the problem to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer within the term of the warranty or one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser, whichever comes first.

  • After receiving timely notice of the problem, the manufacturer or its authorized dealer must repair the problem even if the repair cannot be performed until after the expiration of the manufacturer’s express warranty.
  • Question: What if the problem I reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer continues to persist? Answer: You may be entitled to a refund of the purchase or lease price or a comparable replacement vehicle if the problem persists after a reasonable number of repair attempts.

Question: What is considered a reasonable number of repair attempts? Answer: It is presumed that a reasonable number of repair attempts have been taken if one of the following occurs: (a) The same defect or condition continues to exist even though the vehicle has been subjected to repair a total of four or more times within two years of the date of the first attempt to repair the defect or condition; or (b) The vehicle is out of service because of repairs for a total of 30 or more days or parts of days during the term of the manufacturer’s express warranty, or within one year from the date of delivery to the original consumer, whichever comes first.

This option does not require the same problem to be the cause of the days out of service. Question: My vehicle still isn’t fixed after a reasonable number of repair attempts, how do I get a refund or replacement? Answer: You must give the manufacturer one last opportunity to repair the vehicle by giving the manufacturer written notice, by return receipt service, of the need to repair the vehicle.

Notice can be given at any time after the third attempt to repair the same defect or condition or at any time after the vehicle has been out of service for at least 25 days in a repair facility. After receiving notice, the manufacturer must notify you as soon as reasonably possible of a reasonably accessible repair facility to take your vehicle to have it repaired.

  • Complies with the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, 15 U.S.C.2301 et seq. ;
  • Requires that the manufacturer be bound by a decision that the consumer agrees to; Provides that the consumer is not obligated to accept the decision and may pursue the remedies provided by the Lemon Law; and
  • Requires the manufacturer to begin the process of implementing any final settlement not more than 30 days after the settlement has been reached.

Question: If the manufacturer offers a replacement vehicle, can I demand a refund instead? Answer: Yes. As the buyer or lessee, you have the right to demand a refund or you may choose to accept a comparable replacement motor vehicle currently in production.

  • If you are leasing the vehicle, and agree to accept a replacement vehicle, the lease agreement cannot be changed, except to substitute the vehicle identification number.
  • Question: What is considered the purchase or lease price for purposes of a refund under the Lemon Law? Answer: The purchase price or lease price includes the cost of any options or other modifications installed or made by or for the manufacturer, and the amount of all other charges made by or for the manufacturer, less a reasonable allowance for your use of the vehicle and an amount equal to any appraised damage that is not attributable to normal use or to the defect or condition.

Further, the manufacturer must reimburse you for towing costs and reasonable costs for a comparable rental vehicle that were incurred as a direct result of the defect or condition. Question: What should I do to protect my rights under the Lemon Law? Answer:

  • Keep copies of all correspondence to and from the manufacturer and the dealer.
  • Keep copies of all work orders for repairs on the vehicle, including the date(s) the work was performed and the mileage on the vehicle at the time of the repair(s).
  • Follow all requirements of the warranty, including any requirement that the repairs must be done by an authorized dealer specified by the manufacturer.

Is there a Lemon Law for used cars in Michigan?

No, but because Michigan law defines a ‘new car’ to include a car still ‘covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease,’ it could apply to a used car that meets that criteria.

How long is the Lemon Law in Michigan?

How does the Michigan Lemon Law work? – Michigan’s Lemon Law covers drivers whose vehicles suffer a non-conformity or defect within the first year or express warranty period, whichever comes first, that can’t be repaired after repeated attempts (normally four) by the manufacturer’s authorized dealership.

How long do you have to return a used car in Michigan?

Returning the Vehicle After Purchase – Some people believe they have the right to return the vehicle within three days of buying or leasing it under the lemon law, but that is not the case. There is no “cooling-off period” in Michigan; generally, the state’s contract law does not allow consumers to cancel a sale.

  • However, there are some very limited exceptions for contract cancellation, according to the Attorney General.
  • A dealership may offer a consumer an extended test drive, allowing them to take a vehicle home for a short period before purchase, but that has nothing to do with contract law.
  • Michigan’s Lemon Law gives consumers the right to return their vehicle and get a refund or replacement, but this is not possible until a reasonable number of repair attempts take place.
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Of course, this will occur in a period of more than three days after purchasing or leasing the vehicle.

Can you sue a car dealership in Michigan?

Can I File A Lawsuit For Auto Dealer Fraud? – Whether you have a valid auto dealer fraud case depends on what the fraud is, how long ago it happened, and whether or not you signed a contract with an arbitration clause in it. If there’s an arbitration clause, you have to go to arbitration.

  • Arbitration is a private courthouse that is paid for by companies.
  • Consumer advocates have been trying to get rid of arbitration clauses for a long time because they hurt consumers.
  • You can bring a claim if you’ve been cheated by a car dealer, as long as there was a legal violation.
  • For more information on Auto Dealer Fraud Cases In Michigan, a free initial consultation is your next best step.

Get the information and legal answers you are seeking by calling (248) 843-0550 today.

Can you return a car under warranty?

A car warranty gives you protection against having to pay for labour costs and replacement of certain parts of your vehicle if they suffer from mechanical faults or electrical failure. Often it can be very expensive to repair your vehicle. It’s important to check how to keep your warranty valid.

  1. There may be a maximum millage, or you might need to service your car at specific intervals and missing a service could make the warranty invalid.
  2. Check the warranty carefully and see what exactly is covered.
  3. If something isn’t clear, ask someone to explain.
  4. Often, you’ll need to pay an amount towards getting the parts replaced and fitted.

This is the excess and is normally a few hundred pounds. If you buy a car new, or a used car from a dealer, the warranty might come as standard, or you might have to pay for it. Every car warranty covers different parts, has different terms and conditions, and the costs for warranties can also vary significantly.

engine and fuel systems clutch and gearbox suspension brakes steering.

Sometimes you can extend the warranty so that it covers you for a year or two more, or so the warranty includes cover for extra problems. You’ll need to pay a bit extra if you want to upgrade your warranty. A report by Which? said: “It’s difficult to justify the cost of even the cheapest used car warranty when you consider the endless exclusions, pricey premiums and low average expense of yearly repairs.

  1. We’d recommend setting money aside each year to cover any repairs, but if you’re intent on getting a warranty, consider paying for it when you buy your car.
  2. These manufacturer extended warranties tend to have fewer exclusions than their third-party rivals.” All new cars come with a manufacturers’ warranty.

These can last between three to seven years and should cover most faults except wear and tear of parts such as tyres and brake pads. For the warranty to be valid, you usually have to follow some rules. For example, ensuring the car is serviced on time and at a reputable dealer.

build up savings to cover unexpected costs – take a look at our emergency savings page for help building up emergency savings sell your car and buy one which does have a warranty buy a new warranty – you can use a comparison site to help find the best policy deals

Making sure you meet the rules and requirements of your warranty policy is essential to avoid having claims declined. Claims can be invalidated by:

continuing to use your vehicle even if a warning light appears on the dashboard driving your vehicle even though there’s a noticeable mechanical or electrical fault not getting your vehicle serviced at the intervals recommended by the vehicle’s manufacturer making modifications to the vehicle, or fitting non-standard or non-manufacturer approved parts during repairs putting the wrong fuel or fluids into your vehicle e.g. oil or coolant not following the warranty claim procedure correctly.

Before taking out a car warranty make sure you read the small print. Here are the basic points you need to check.

Is there a limit to the amount of money you can make a claim for? Does the warranty have an excess? Is the servicing schedule acceptable? Is there a standard 14-day cooling off period? Does it state a limit for either your annual or total mileage? Can you only make a claim after a set period, such as a month? Does the policy cover the full cost of repair – not just parts or labour? Is the warranty company registered with the ABI (Association of British Insurers)? Is there a maximum amount paid for labour costs, leaving you to foot the bill for the extra? Which garages are on the list used for servicing and repair, and what are their locations and costs? Remember if your car is approaching the maximum age allowed, it might not be worth buying a warranty. Warranty agreements often use very specific terminology, so you might not know exactly what is meant by terms like ‘betterment’ or ‘wear and tear.’ Which? has an A-Z list to help you out

A warranty doesn’t replace your legal rights under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, So, along with any protection your warranty offers, under the act you have the right to reject a car if it is faulty and get a full refund within 30 days of buying it. You may also have protection under section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 and the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

  1. You’ll have protection if you paid using a credit card or bought the car with hire purchase from a dealer.
  2. Section 75 means the credit card provider, or finance provider in the case of hire purchase, is jointly responsible for any problems.
  3. If you’re having problems with the service you’re receiving as part of your warranty, for example a bad repair, there are steps you can take.

First you should always get in touch with the garage or dealer to try and sort out the situation. If you can’t come to an agreement, you should get in touch with the trade association for the garage or dealer you’re dealing with.

Can you return a used car if it has problems in Michigan?

Questions and Answers About the Lemon Law – Question: Which vehicles are covered by Michigan’s Lemon Law? Answer: The Lemon Law applies to passenger vehicles, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and vans that are purchased or leased in Michigan or purchased or leased by a Michigan resident (regardless of whether the vehicle was purchased or leased in Michigan) and covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease.

  1. The Lemon Law does not apply to motor homes, buses, trucks other than pickups and vans, motorcycles, or off-road vehicles.
  2. Question: What about used vehicles? Answer: This is tricky.
  3. Generally, the Lemon Law does not apply to used vehicles.
  4. But the Lemon Law does apply to a vehicle still “covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease,” if the problem is reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer within one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser.

Thus, the Lemon Law may apply to a “used” vehicle that meets these criteria. Question: To whom does Michigan’s Lemon Law apply? Answer: The lemon law applies to a person who:

    1. Purchases or leases a new motor vehicle for personal, family, or household use and not to sell or lease the new motor vehicle to another person;
    2. Purchases or leases less than 10 new motor vehicles a year;
    3. Purchases or leases 10 or more new motor vehicles a year only if the vehicles are purchased or leased for personal, family, or household use; or
    4. Is entitled to enforce the provisions of an express warranty pursuant to the terms of that warranty.

A “person” under the Lemon Law is a natural person, a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, association, unit or agency of government, trust, estate, or other legal entity. Question: Under the Lemon Law, do I have a right to return my vehicle within three days of purchase? Answer: No.

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Many consumers mistakenly believe that a “cooling off period” that allows you to cancel some written contracts in very limited circumstances applies to all purchases. On the contrary, as a general matter of contract law, consumers do not have the right to cancel a sale of goods or services. To learn more about the limited right to contract cancellation, read the Attorney General’s Consumer Alert, I Changed My Mind – Can I Cancel This Contract ? Some dealers offer extended test drives and allow customers to take vehicles home overnight or for a few days, but that is a promotional tactic and not a matter of contract law.

The remedies provided by the Lemon Law, which include the right to return your vehicle and receive a refund of the purchase or lease price, are not triggered until the vehicle is subjected to a reasonable number of repairs—which will occur well beyond three days after your purchase.

  1. Question: What problems or defects does the Lemon Law cover? Answer: The Lemon Law covers any defect or condition that impairs the use or value of the new motor vehicle to the consumer or prevents the new motor vehicle from conforming to the manufacturer’s express warranty.
  2. The Lemon Law does not cover any defect or condition that is the result of a modification not installed or made by or for the manufacturer, or abuse or neglect of the new motor vehicle, or damage due to an accident occurring after the new motor vehicle’s purchase or lease.

Question: What is the first step to recovering under the Lemon Law? Answer: To recover under the Lemon Law, you must first report the problem to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer within the term of the warranty or one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser, whichever comes first.

  1. After receiving timely notice of the problem, the manufacturer or its authorized dealer must repair the problem even if the repair cannot be performed until after the expiration of the manufacturer’s express warranty.
  2. Question: What if the problem I reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer continues to persist? Answer: You may be entitled to a refund of the purchase or lease price or a comparable replacement vehicle if the problem persists after a reasonable number of repair attempts.

Question: What is considered a reasonable number of repair attempts? Answer: It is presumed that a reasonable number of repair attempts have been taken if one of the following occurs: (a) The same defect or condition continues to exist even though the vehicle has been subjected to repair a total of four or more times within two years of the date of the first attempt to repair the defect or condition; or (b) The vehicle is out of service because of repairs for a total of 30 or more days or parts of days during the term of the manufacturer’s express warranty, or within one year from the date of delivery to the original consumer, whichever comes first.

  • This option does not require the same problem to be the cause of the days out of service.
  • Question: My vehicle still isn’t fixed after a reasonable number of repair attempts, how do I get a refund or replacement? Answer: You must give the manufacturer one last opportunity to repair the vehicle by giving the manufacturer written notice, by return receipt service, of the need to repair the vehicle.

Notice can be given at any time after the third attempt to repair the same defect or condition or at any time after the vehicle has been out of service for at least 25 days in a repair facility. After receiving notice, the manufacturer must notify you as soon as reasonably possible of a reasonably accessible repair facility to take your vehicle to have it repaired.

  • Complies with the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, 15 U.S.C.2301 et seq. ;
  • Requires that the manufacturer be bound by a decision that the consumer agrees to; Provides that the consumer is not obligated to accept the decision and may pursue the remedies provided by the Lemon Law; and
  • Requires the manufacturer to begin the process of implementing any final settlement not more than 30 days after the settlement has been reached.

Question: If the manufacturer offers a replacement vehicle, can I demand a refund instead? Answer: Yes. As the buyer or lessee, you have the right to demand a refund or you may choose to accept a comparable replacement motor vehicle currently in production.

If you are leasing the vehicle, and agree to accept a replacement vehicle, the lease agreement cannot be changed, except to substitute the vehicle identification number. Question: What is considered the purchase or lease price for purposes of a refund under the Lemon Law? Answer: The purchase price or lease price includes the cost of any options or other modifications installed or made by or for the manufacturer, and the amount of all other charges made by or for the manufacturer, less a reasonable allowance for your use of the vehicle and an amount equal to any appraised damage that is not attributable to normal use or to the defect or condition.

Further, the manufacturer must reimburse you for towing costs and reasonable costs for a comparable rental vehicle that were incurred as a direct result of the defect or condition. Question: What should I do to protect my rights under the Lemon Law? Answer:

  • Keep copies of all correspondence to and from the manufacturer and the dealer.
  • Keep copies of all work orders for repairs on the vehicle, including the date(s) the work was performed and the mileage on the vehicle at the time of the repair(s).
  • Follow all requirements of the warranty, including any requirement that the repairs must be done by an authorized dealer specified by the manufacturer.

How long do I have to return a faulty car?

Your legal rights if something goes wrong with your car The law states that a vehicle must be of a satisfactory quality, fit for purpose and as described. To be of satisfactory quality, a car must not be faulty or broken when purchased, and it must be of a standard that a reasonable person would expect, taking into account its age and mileage if it’s secondhand.

An older car with more miles on the clock is not expected to be as good as a newer one with a lower mileage, although both should be roadworthy, reliable and of a quality consistent with their age and the price paid. The car should be fit for the purpose for which it has been supplied; this includes any specific purpose you tell a dealer you want to use it for prior to buying it.

So, if you’ve told a dealer you want to tow a caravan, the car should be capable of doing that. It should also match any description you were given of it, or any model shown to you when you bought it. If the car does not live up to any one of these criteria, you’re entitled to hand it back and get all your money refunded. What Is The Lemon Law In Michigan If a problem is found after 30 days, but within six months of purchase, you can request a repair or a replacement vehicle. The onus is on the seller of the car to prove the fault wasn’t present when it was sold; if they can, and you’re likely to have known about it, you won’t get a refund.

How long after a car accident can you sue in Michigan?

If you’ve been injured in a Michigan auto accident, you generally have three years from the date of the crash to file a lawsuit against the at-fault driver for the injuries you sustained. This three-year period is known as the ‘statute of limitations.’ It applies to both bodily injury and wrongful death claims.

What legal action can be taken against the dealer?

You can file a suit before the State Consumer redressal commission for unfair trade practices and also for service deficiency.

Can you return a used car if it has problems in Michigan?

Questions and Answers About the Lemon Law – Question: Which vehicles are covered by Michigan’s Lemon Law? Answer: The Lemon Law applies to passenger vehicles, sport utility vehicles, pickup trucks, and vans that are purchased or leased in Michigan or purchased or leased by a Michigan resident (regardless of whether the vehicle was purchased or leased in Michigan) and covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease.

  1. The Lemon Law does not apply to motor homes, buses, trucks other than pickups and vans, motorcycles, or off-road vehicles.
  2. Question: What about used vehicles? Answer: This is tricky.
  3. Generally, the Lemon Law does not apply to used vehicles.
  4. But the Lemon Law does apply to a vehicle still “covered by a manufacturer’s express warranty at the time of purchase or lease,” if the problem is reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer within one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser.
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Thus, the Lemon Law may apply to a “used” vehicle that meets these criteria. Question: To whom does Michigan’s Lemon Law apply? Answer: The lemon law applies to a person who:

    1. Purchases or leases a new motor vehicle for personal, family, or household use and not to sell or lease the new motor vehicle to another person;
    2. Purchases or leases less than 10 new motor vehicles a year;
    3. Purchases or leases 10 or more new motor vehicles a year only if the vehicles are purchased or leased for personal, family, or household use; or
    4. Is entitled to enforce the provisions of an express warranty pursuant to the terms of that warranty.

A “person” under the Lemon Law is a natural person, a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, association, unit or agency of government, trust, estate, or other legal entity. Question: Under the Lemon Law, do I have a right to return my vehicle within three days of purchase? Answer: No.

Many consumers mistakenly believe that a “cooling off period” that allows you to cancel some written contracts in very limited circumstances applies to all purchases. On the contrary, as a general matter of contract law, consumers do not have the right to cancel a sale of goods or services. To learn more about the limited right to contract cancellation, read the Attorney General’s Consumer Alert, I Changed My Mind – Can I Cancel This Contract ? Some dealers offer extended test drives and allow customers to take vehicles home overnight or for a few days, but that is a promotional tactic and not a matter of contract law.

The remedies provided by the Lemon Law, which include the right to return your vehicle and receive a refund of the purchase or lease price, are not triggered until the vehicle is subjected to a reasonable number of repairs—which will occur well beyond three days after your purchase.

  1. Question: What problems or defects does the Lemon Law cover? Answer: The Lemon Law covers any defect or condition that impairs the use or value of the new motor vehicle to the consumer or prevents the new motor vehicle from conforming to the manufacturer’s express warranty.
  2. The Lemon Law does not cover any defect or condition that is the result of a modification not installed or made by or for the manufacturer, or abuse or neglect of the new motor vehicle, or damage due to an accident occurring after the new motor vehicle’s purchase or lease.

Question: What is the first step to recovering under the Lemon Law? Answer: To recover under the Lemon Law, you must first report the problem to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer within the term of the warranty or one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser, whichever comes first.

  • After receiving timely notice of the problem, the manufacturer or its authorized dealer must repair the problem even if the repair cannot be performed until after the expiration of the manufacturer’s express warranty.
  • Question: What if the problem I reported to the manufacturer or its authorized dealer continues to persist? Answer: You may be entitled to a refund of the purchase or lease price or a comparable replacement vehicle if the problem persists after a reasonable number of repair attempts.

Question: What is considered a reasonable number of repair attempts? Answer: It is presumed that a reasonable number of repair attempts have been taken if one of the following occurs: (a) The same defect or condition continues to exist even though the vehicle has been subjected to repair a total of four or more times within two years of the date of the first attempt to repair the defect or condition; or (b) The vehicle is out of service because of repairs for a total of 30 or more days or parts of days during the term of the manufacturer’s express warranty, or within one year from the date of delivery to the original consumer, whichever comes first.

This option does not require the same problem to be the cause of the days out of service. Question: My vehicle still isn’t fixed after a reasonable number of repair attempts, how do I get a refund or replacement? Answer: You must give the manufacturer one last opportunity to repair the vehicle by giving the manufacturer written notice, by return receipt service, of the need to repair the vehicle.

Notice can be given at any time after the third attempt to repair the same defect or condition or at any time after the vehicle has been out of service for at least 25 days in a repair facility. After receiving notice, the manufacturer must notify you as soon as reasonably possible of a reasonably accessible repair facility to take your vehicle to have it repaired.

  • Complies with the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, 15 U.S.C.2301 et seq. ;
  • Requires that the manufacturer be bound by a decision that the consumer agrees to; Provides that the consumer is not obligated to accept the decision and may pursue the remedies provided by the Lemon Law; and
  • Requires the manufacturer to begin the process of implementing any final settlement not more than 30 days after the settlement has been reached.

Question: If the manufacturer offers a replacement vehicle, can I demand a refund instead? Answer: Yes. As the buyer or lessee, you have the right to demand a refund or you may choose to accept a comparable replacement motor vehicle currently in production.

If you are leasing the vehicle, and agree to accept a replacement vehicle, the lease agreement cannot be changed, except to substitute the vehicle identification number. Question: What is considered the purchase or lease price for purposes of a refund under the Lemon Law? Answer: The purchase price or lease price includes the cost of any options or other modifications installed or made by or for the manufacturer, and the amount of all other charges made by or for the manufacturer, less a reasonable allowance for your use of the vehicle and an amount equal to any appraised damage that is not attributable to normal use or to the defect or condition.

Further, the manufacturer must reimburse you for towing costs and reasonable costs for a comparable rental vehicle that were incurred as a direct result of the defect or condition. Question: What should I do to protect my rights under the Lemon Law? Answer:

  • Keep copies of all correspondence to and from the manufacturer and the dealer.
  • Keep copies of all work orders for repairs on the vehicle, including the date(s) the work was performed and the mileage on the vehicle at the time of the repair(s).
  • Follow all requirements of the warranty, including any requirement that the repairs must be done by an authorized dealer specified by the manufacturer.

Is there a cooling off period in Michigan?

Three Day Cancellation Rule 1 – The Home Solicitation Sales Act – Michigan’s Home Solicitation Sales Act (HSSA) gives consumers who are solicited in their homes three business days to decide whether to cancel a contract. Here are some basic points about the HSSA. You are protected by Michigan’s HSSA when:

  • The solicitation for the sale was initiated by the seller, through a personal, written, or telephone contact;
  • The solicitation was received at your home (this includes mail or telephone calls, but not newspaper ads);
  • Your agreement to purchase (contract) was given to the salesperson at your home, AND
  • The goods or services purchased are worth more than $25.

The Federal Trade Commission has a similar provision: FTC Rule Concerning Cooling-Off Period for Sales Made at Homes or at Certain Other Locations, 16 CFR 429,

Do dealers have to give warranty?

Dealer-provided warranty – There is no legal obligation for car dealers to provide any kind of warranty, but many independent dealers will offer their own with the used cars they sell. How long these warranties last for can vary depending both on the dealer, and on how old the car is (with newer cars typically having longer warranties), while you may be given a warranty for free, or be offered the option to buy one.